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Thread: Love Actually

  1. #21
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    I thougt it was 'ok' didn't feel like I wanted my money back, didn't feel like buying it on DVD, won't even record it off the TV. it suprises me just how well it did and the hype it got. Great cast yes but none of them were stretched in anyway. Laura linney's character was my favourite bit but in general it felt more like a promo video for casting british actors.

  2. #22
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    Too lightweight.

    Too predictable.

    Two planks.





    Dave.

  3. #23
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    Since Christmas is all around once more I'll bring that thread from the sinking.



    I liked the film. It's really funny and romantic. It's none of my absolute favourites but works for me. What is it about the foul language? Apart from Billy Mack I don't seem to remember. It was cheesy and everything of course, but I think it's what we had to expect from a Richard Curtis Christmas movie. Emma Thompson gave an incredible performance, and little Thomas Sangster made me wish to be 10 years old again.



    This was by the way the film that kinda opened at least one of my eyes for Mr. Nighy (Still Crazy opened the other eye very jerkily). I knew him from Blow Dry, but had watched both films originally because of Alan Rickman. I remember when I left the cinema after Love Actually everybody seemed to talk about that hilarious washed-up rocker.



    Like many I think Hugh Grant was miscasted as the PM. Funny enough while watching the film I thought that Tony Head would have been the perfect choice for that role, being way closer to that mix of distinguished behaviour and boyish charm the role requested. That was long before Little Britain and I plan to sue Walliams and Lucas for stealing that idea from my mind. *nods*



    My two pence.

  4. #24
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    Manipulative tripe is what I thought.



    Will Self said the opening was the most manipulative piece of cinema since Leni Reifenstahl's Triumph of the Will!

  5. #25
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    Well, Richard Curtis is interested in politics, though his kind of selling it may not be the most distinguished. I never considered the opening very manipulative. I wouldn't have accepted it in a more demanding film, but it looked alright in the context.

  6. #26
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    Well I like it..................



    I just sit and watch and enjoy it with a glass of wine - it's easy & lightweight.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StrangeFruit42
    Well, Richard Curtis is interested in politics,
    Aha.

    And watching it for the second time, I thought it was just me.



    Tragic figures, living in smart stainless steel apartments who have orphaned but mature 11-year-old sons who fall in love with R&B prodigies who just happen to go to the same school as they do. A touchy-feely PM who rumbles the damned Yankee conspiracy, much to the smug self-satisfied smirking of his young, female and black apparatchik (all boxes present and correct). Meanwhile, back in America, every bar has blonde Texans gagging for inarticulate Brit-yoof. Yoofs can charge through airport security without being held down and shot six times in the head. A proletariat that has the PM knocking on their door and they just tell him to try the next house because, hey - he's just a guy like us! Whilst the female tea-lady, having canoodled with a clearly corrupt US president and failed to sell her story to the Guardian, canoodles with the Prime-Minister instead but of course that's love, actually. No wonder the F.A. was like it was. We also discover that the Portuguese are only too desperate to sell their daughters to rich English writers, especially if those daughters are fat and ugly (and preferably poor). What a great politically correct film............



    What a jolly world of happy yuppies the Blair years have given us. I'll bet all the luvvies thought they were telling it like it is........... well it probably was... isn't it?




  8. #28
    Super Moderator Country: UK christoph404's Avatar
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    Very silly film with awfully crass syrupy episodes IMHO, what is watchable is Emma Thompson's performance as a hurt wife to Alan Rickman, I really believed her and felt involved with her emotions which I guess is a testament to how talented an actor she is considering the terrible script she and Rickman were working with especially the ludicrous and unsubtle exchanges he has with his would be lover......just daft! I believe the film was a monster hit with a very large following, definitley a succesful "chick flick" which would possibly explain why most of us cycnical chaps are not keen on it!

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by StrangeFruit42
    Well, Richard Curtis is interested in politics. . .
    Yeah, Hugh Grant's little dialogue with the portrait of Maggie on the wall was a bit of of a giveaway as to which party this "touchy feely" PM belonged to.

  10. #30
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    I can suffer Huge Grunt. I rather like Bill Nighy. Not very keen on Emma Thompson or Liam Neeson but, if the film's good enough, I can be persuaded to watch it.

    However, even for �1,000,000 and 3 nights with The Man Of My Dreams, I could not be convinced that ANYTHING on Earth is worth watching that has Martine McCutcheon in it!



    YSL x.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Holmes
    I found this film both funny and touching. Yes it has its cloying moments but I can't understand why people are so vitriolic about it and it's creator.
    Speaking personally, I have to say that the words "Richard Curtis" for me have come to symbolise how a certain "political luvvie" creed seems to have taken over almost all forms of the British Media.



    The catalyst for me was in that absolutely shocking (shockingly-biased, that is) & distorted piece of BBC-sponsored political propaganda masquerading as a TV drama - "The girl in the cafe"



    After that, I can never hear the name Richard Curtis with anything other than distaste, I'm afraid - and that matters in the context of "Love Actually" for me.



    While I appreciate that this is not the case for everybody, it nonetheless must mean that if Curtis uses his power to political ends, he is bound to get (and to deserve) the aforementioned vitriol from some sections of society.



    Nature of the beast, I'm afraid, whenever one dabbles in politics.




  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moor Larkin

    Tragic figures, living in smart stainless steel apartments who have orphaned but mature 11-year-old sons who fall in love with R&B prodigies who just happen to go to the same school as they do. A touchy-feely PM who rumbles the damned Yankee conspiracy, much to the smug self-satisfied smirking of his young, female and black apparatchik (all boxes present and correct). Meanwhile, back in America, every bar has blonde Texans gagging for inarticulate Brit-yoof. Yoofs can charge through airport security without being held down and shot six times in the head. A proletariat that has the PM knocking on their door and they just tell him to try the next house because, hey - he's just a guy like us! Whilst the female tea-lady, having canoodled with a clearly corrupt US president and failed to sell her story to the Guardian, canoodles with the Prime-Minister instead but of course that's love, actually. No wonder the F.A. was like it was. We also discover that the Portuguese are only too desperate to sell their daughters to rich English writers, especially if those daughters are fat and ugly (and preferably poor). What a great politically correct film............
    Yeah, Moor Larkin, that's exactly what I thought... a very silly film...

  13. #33
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    Wouldn't watch anything with Hugh Grant in it at gunpoint.

  14. #34
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    While I will admit I loved Four Weddings, and Nottinghill had some element of appeal to me for a variety reasons, I always thought Love Actually was something of a well wrapped Xmas that when you opened the contents were rather disappointing and the wrapping more inspiring.



    I thought the voice over in the opening had some balls to mention 9/11 and the phone calls (this narrrative by the way was cut from all air line versions and also some states in the USA)



    Curtis, by his own admission wanted to make a feel good movie reflecting the many ways love can show itself in different relationships with different people. While I think many of these things were honest portrayals of probably scenarios from real life, to see such a sickly run of so much feel good treacle was too much for many to swallow. The whole love triangle 'best man loves the bride' bit seemed very unplausable in the way it played out but then one must accept with a film that asks to believe that Hugh Grant is our Prime Minister (prehaps a better alternative to the one we have at present) we must also accept that we are living in fantasy land here. Some of the storylines could have had been (good or bad) films in their own right, then others are are just worse than anything. It is hard to reconcile Curtis's gesture towards the victims of 9/11 at the beginning with his less than comical display of lack of Airport security at the end of the film. Ultimately the film is a mess. A whole film with Bill Nighy as his character would have been better, a sort of one man band version of a This Is Spinal Tap revisted.

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by 716Jones
    Wouldn't watch anything with Hugh Grant in it at gunpoint.
    I think that is unfair, but obviouslly that is your opinion. I quite like old Hugh.

  16. #36
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    The film is ok not a classic but neither is it a bomb. When you see who is in it, who directs and who the script is by then you get an idea of the film that you are paying to see.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azanti
    A whole film with Bill Nighy as his character would have been better, a sort of one man band version of a This Is Spinal Tap revisted.
    I took a closer look at some props like Billy Mack's albums, and he is indeed under conract at the same record company as the Tap. It's amazing anyway how much backstory Billy had, that wasn't mentioned in the film, like the biography that was covered on the CD single of ''Christmas Is All Around''. So, from that point Bill Nighy's character was indeed the most complex of the film, which says a lot.



    @ stevie boy

    I liked Four Weddings And A Funeral, and also liked Hugh Grant in it. Notting Hill also is a very charming film, but Hugh Grant is exactly the same again. Just like in all of his other films. What do we like to remember about his films? We remember John Hannah, Rhys Ifans, Bill Nighy, but rarely Mr. Grant himself.



    And about the personality he's trying to sell: Does anyone really need him still? Bill Nighy is better being a bit shy and awkward, not only because it's closer to his personality. And about the uncombed and charming ladies' guy - Well, there's David Tennant f.e., to drop only one name. Both of them never needed any kind of scandals or bad stories to sell their work.

  18. #38
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    4 weddings is simply a brilliant film for all of us slush puppies. And for some great lines and Simon Calow.

    Notting Hill I'm afraid had Julia 'mersey tunnel mouth turned up nosey' Roberts in it so I didn't bother. I don't care much for her at all.

    Love actually treads a very similar Curtisian path to the above and I think is good fun. Anything with Colin Firth in it is good ....isn't it?

    Totally unbelievable tosh mind you but then again so is Lord of the Rings and I loved that too.

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by scholes
    Notting Hill I'm afraid had Julia 'mersey tunnel mouth turned up nosey' Roberts in it so I didn't bother. I don't care much for her at all.
    It also had Rhys Ifans and Dylan Moran in great supporting roles. A thing I noticed about the works of Curtis with Grant. The characters people were talking about when leaving the cinema were rarely Grant's. They talked about John Hannah and the poem in Four Weddings, Rhys Ifans in Notting Hill and Bill Nighy in Love Actually.

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