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  1. #1
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain vaggmk1938's Avatar
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    For any American members or viewers: TCM is airiing "Battle of Britain" at 3 p.m. EDT--Hurry!

  2. #2
    Member Country: Croatia
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    I have a feeling Battle of Britain has been terribly underrated. Apparently, it is rarely aired in USA, but this one really has both a dose of authenticity (from the mouth of veterans) but it entertains on the level as well! The overall production was excellent and I hope it will gain more appreciation with time.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Country: Canada
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    Having lived here in Toronto for many years,i have made many trips to the USA. When it comes to British telly programms,americans don't enbrace too many of our programms. The Avengers,with Diana Rigg was a huge success in that country. Just recently they began to run episodes of The Bill,it did not last 6 months,then again,i could not blame them,they started showing episodes,those episodes that have developed into a soap opera type of programm. I don't think americans have too much interest in a cop soap opera. Way back in 1960 or 1961,Carry on nurse was released to the cinema's. The film was a huge success, the other Carry on films,only a few came to america,were a disaster. As for britsih comedy,american's don't understand our humour,and do not enbrace our comedy,yet,Benny Hill was a great success and Keeping up appearances was also popular.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Country: United States
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    I think I've seen MAN WHO NEVER WAS and SINK THE BISMARCK (or, as I insist to Steve, "Battle of 560km West of Brest") at least twice a year on TCM, far more often than the every other year schedule for BATTLE OF B, which feels so 'Hollywoodish' in comparison.



    Recently, we've seen THE KEY, CARVE HER NAME and AT DAWN WE DIVE. I hope we get more.

  5. #5
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    TCM (US) are due to start a season of early British films made by Warner Bros/ First National at Teddington Studios.



    Here is the list of films TCM have announced so far as showing in September for the Teddington festival:



    September 17

    Something Always Happens (1934)

    Crown vs. Stevens (1936)

    The Peterville Diamond (1942)

    (all three will air twice each on the 17th)



    September 24

    Crime Unlimited (1935)

    Man of the Moment (1935) -- Fairbanks, Jr.

    The Dark Tower (1943) -- David Farrar is in this one

    (these three will also air twice each)



    September 25

    Flying Fortress (1942)

    This Was Paris (1942)

    The Prime Minister (1941)



    There may well be others in this season, these are all we've been able to find out about so far



    Something Always Happens (1934) & Crown vs. Stevens (1936) were both made by a young director called Michael Powell. They are part of what is often called his "Quota Quickies" although they weren't really all quota films. But they were usually made quickly and to a low budget. But that's no reason why they shouldn't be worth watching. They let him learn his craft and try out techniques that he then used again, to better effect, in his later films.



    Steve

  6. #6
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    TCM are doing fairly good things when it comes to screening Brit gems in this country! Very few cuts (or none at all!) Movies often coupled with others of the same genre from the same period...



    I occasionally manage to catch a few of them... never enough.



    I'm sure that Brit films would do much better on US TV were it not for the "language difficulty"! I'm constantly explaining terms and expressions to my (American) wife... not everyone has the luxury of being married to their own British-English interpreter, however. And confusion ensues when one word means many different things depending on the context..



    for example:



    nick - to steal



    nick - prison



    nick - condition (as in: that car's in good nick for its age...)



    nick - to catch in the act (as in: they did the local jewellers and were nicked...)



    Also different meanings for common terms that may be misconstrued:



    for example:



    mad = crazy (UK) but = angry (US)



    pissed = drunk (UK) but = annoyed (US)



    and jacket (UK) = coat (US)



    vest = undergarment (UK) but waistcoat-type garment (US)





    Maybe subtitles are the answer?

  7. #7
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    name='NappieB']TCM are doing fairly good things when it comes to screening Brit gems in this country! Very few cuts (or none at all!) Movies often coupled with others of the same genre from the same period...



    I occasionally manage to catch a few of them... never enough.



    I'm sure that Brit films would do much better on US TV were it not for the "language difficulty"! I'm constantly explaining terms and expressions to my (American) wife... not everyone has the luxury of being married to their own British-English interpreter, however. And confusion ensues when one word means many different things depending on the context..



    for example:



    nick - to steal



    nick - prison



    nick - condition (as in: that car's in good nick for its age...)



    nick - to catch in the act (as in: they did the local jewellers and were nicked...)



    Also different meanings for common terms that may be misconstrued:



    for example:



    mad = crazy (UK) but = angry (US)



    pissed = drunk (UK) but = annoyed (US)



    and jacket (UK) = coat (US)



    vest = undergarment (UK) but waistcoat-type garment (US)





    Maybe subtitles are the answer?
    I work with an American lady and we sometimes amuse ourselves discussing these odd differences in the languages.



    Like with the word 'presently' which in American usually means "in a short while", but in English usually means "for a short while".



    Not much of a difference I hear you say? Consider the airport announcement saying "Flight XYZ will take off presently". What, will it just circle around and land again?



    Steve



    Edit: It works even better with "Momentarily"

  8. #8
    Senior Member Country: Europe
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    name='Steve Crook']TCM (US) are due to start a season of early British films made by Warner Bros/ First National at Teddington Studios.



    Here is the list of films TCM have announced so far as showing in September for the Teddington festival:



    September 17

    Something Always Happens (1934)

    Crown vs. Stevens (1936)

    The Peterville Diamond (1942)

    (all three will air twice each on the 17th)



    September 24

    Crime Unlimited (1935)

    Man of the Moment (1935) -- Fairbanks, Jr.

    The Dark Tower (1943) -- David Farrar is in this one

    (these three will also air twice each)



    September 25

    Flying Fortress (1942)

    This Was Paris (1942)

    The Prime Minister (1941)



    There may well be others in this season, these are all we've been able to find out about so far



    Something Always Happens (1934) & Crown vs. Stevens (1936) were both made by a young director called Michael Powell. They are part of what is often called his "Quota Quickies" although they weren't really all quota films. But they were usually made quickly and to a low budget. But that's no reason why they shouldn't be worth watching. They let him learn his craft and try out techniques that he then used again, to better effect, in his later films.



    Steve


    Might be nice if they showed them over here!

  9. #9
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    Tell me more about 'Flying Fortress' Fell, is it about B17s?

  10. #10
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    name='Harleybloke']Tell me more about 'Flying Fortress' Fell, is it about B17s?
    Have a look at the User Comments on the IMDb page about the film



    Steve

  11. #11
    Senior Member Country: Europe
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    name='Harleybloke']Tell me more about 'Flying Fortress' Fell, is it about B17s?
    I've no idea. I've never seen it - which was my point.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Fellwanderer,



    How I wish the same instead of the umpteenth showing of CASABLANCA.



    Aren't sone of these listed as missing in this country?

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