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  1. #1
    Senior Member Country: United States
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    In the biography of Shepperton Studios there is a mention of "Day of the Jackal" implying that this film was shot or based there. In fact the film's interiors and all post production were done at Pinewood Studios. I worked in the post production of this film and met the great Mr. Z.

  2. #2
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    Day of the Jackal is one of my favourite films and one of the best adaptations from a book to film and definately the best adaptation of a Frederick Forsythe thrilller.

    What is your opinion ofthe remake Jackal - mine is it would have worked better if DOTJ hadn't been made.

    Ta Ta

  3. #3
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    'Day of The Jackal' is a superb film. Brilliant performance by Ed Fox.

    The book is excellent too.



    I think that Forsyth's work transforms onto the screen very well, except for 'Dogs of War'.

    Christopher Walken was totally wrong for the title role.

  4. #4
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    I am quite certain this film must surely have been mentioned before.



    I know Fred Zinnemann was born in Vienna but he settled in Britain in 1967 and lived here until his death in 1997. This is a British film.



    And what a magnificent film it is. I fished it out and watched it again the other day. It is quite simply an excellently plotted, wonderfully paced and intelligently made thriller. And in calling it a thriller I am not only referring to the genre - it really is a thriller!



    My version is the widescreen presentation DVD on Columbia Tristar. Not much in the way of extras (only the trailer and production notes) but with a film as good as this who cares.



    Edward Fox is absolutely spiffing as the calculating, sophisticated assassin.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    One of those films I've probably seen too many times. I think the almost documentary feel to Fox's ruthless preparations adds greatly to the film; so much so that you're almost rooting for the assassin.



    God knows what those behind the remake were on. It's almost a Naked Gun satire.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Country: United States theuofc's Avatar
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    (U.V.RAY @ May 30 2006, 08:12 PM)

    I am quite certain this film must surely have been mentioned before.



    I know Fred Zinnemann was born in Vienna but he settled in Britain in 1967 and lived here until his death in 1997. This is a British film.



    And what a magnificent film it is. I fished it out and watched it again the other day. It is quite simply an excellently plotted, wonderfully paced and intelligently made thriller. And in calling it a thriller I am not only referring to the genre - it really is a thriller!



    My version is the widescreen presentation DVD on Columbia Tristar. Not much in the way of extras (only the trailer and production notes) but with a film as good as this who cares.



    Edward Fox is absolutely spiffing as the calculating, sophisticated assassin.
    Total agreement, U.U.RAY. "The Day of the Jackal" has a permanent place on my Favourite Films list. Those titles are the ones I can watch over and over. If I had to lose all my other films, I would want these DVDs.



    The suspense plot is tightly woven, and every thread of the web is intricate and ingenious. At the same time, it is a fascinating story that has me on the edge of my seat always savouring the superb crafting and the dialogue in each scene yet anxious for the next one. As you say, Edward Fox was perfect in the role: charming, detached Evil focused on the deed. The whole cast was excellent, e.g. Michael Lonsdale as the Inspector and Cyril Cusak, the gunsmith. Moreover, the film had wonderful bits of wit.



    Love this film.

    Barbara

  7. #7
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    I had absolutely no idea there has been a re-make!



    It's definitely one of those films that simply does not need one. I don't see how it could be bettered and that is the acid test when it comes to re-makes. Like the film Alien. You simply could not better it.



    I would watch the re-make now just out of curiosity. Bit only if I stumble across it on TV sometime - I wouldn't go out of my way to get it.



    Glad you also enjoyed this one.

  8. #8
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    I've long been a huge fan of this film.

    Forsyth's exceptional writing talent and knowledge, coupled with Fox's astounding portrayal really make this film.

    Always in my top10.

    I know I've said it before; the book is even better.

    It's really only Le Carre and Forsyth who have the skills for this type of genre. I'm a huge Deighton fan, but he isn't really up there with them.

    And I won't even comment on the re-make!

  9. #9
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    I am a big fan of Frederick Forsythe,having read most of his books. He re-invented the thriller. The film does a lot of justice to the book and it is one of those I put in the label "Can watch over and over again". The cast is faultless - my partcular favourite is Michael Lonsdale as the put upon detective - the pace,the plotting all immaculate,making up for the lack of action (no complaint - no action was needed).

    Jackal,the remake,was not that bad - but it would have been better if it Day of the Jackal had not been written and the subsequent film being made. However,then again,without the mind of Forsythe,perhaps that would never have reached the screen.

    The Odessa File was another faithful version of a Forsythe book;The Fourth Protocol needed to be heavily abridged to make a film (then again it would have made an excellent tv series),but my least favourite of Forysthe's was The Dogs Of War,so I won't comment on the film.

    I would have liked to seen a film version of The Devil's Alternative,but now the Cold War is over (or is it),it would lack the impact it made at the time.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

  10. #10
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    The people that made The Jackal (1997) kept on saying that is wasn't a remake of The Day of the Jackal (1973). But giving it a working title of The Day of the Jackal was a bit of a give away.
    It wasn't a working title but the actual intended release title. Zinnermann and Forsyth threatened legal action if the title wasn't altered.



    Like The Italian Job remake, Hollywood had a similar storyline and attempted to tack on a classic film title to push the film commercially.

  11. #11
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    (DB7 @ May 31 2006, 05:40 PM)

    It wasn't a working title but the actual intended release title. Zinnermann and Forsyth threatened legal action if the title wasn't altered.



    Like The Italian Job remake, Hollywood had a similar storyline and attempted to tack on a classic film title to push the film commercially.
    Brilliant movie and full of well known faces

    The first 10 minutes sets it up for me - I have always been a fan of Citroen DS's and the sight of all those lovely cars picking up their ministers in regimented fashion almost makes me a Francophile!

  12. #12
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    It must take some doing,writing a story in which the reader knows the ending (ie we all know De Gaulle died of natural causes and not by an assassin's bullet),yet still keep a tense edge to it. Ron Howard pulled it off with the excellent Apollo 13,that when you knew the astronauts were safe,you gave a sigh of relief and maybe a tear (well that is speaking for me,anyway).

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

  13. #13
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    Another bit of the film worth mentioning is Tony Britton's contribution as the Brummie Special Branch officer. The scene in Donald Sinden's office when the Prime Minister rings up is beautifully acted.

  14. #14
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    Forsyth took his story back to 1963 and I saw the remake of the film 'The Jackal' last night on Australian television(21/10/06). The following prose-poem puts the book and the film in the context of my own life...it's a personal, contextual, comment and perhaps a bit long for some....-Ron Price, Tasmania.

    ____________________________

    A PRECISIONED INSTRUMENT



    In 1970, as I was preparing to leave Canada at the age of 26 to come to teach in Australia, Frederick Forsyth started writing his first novel. His novels were all spy-fiction pieces, thrillers of the first or the second order--or so it is said, for I do not read spy thrillers or, indeed, fiction of any ilk. In 1971, as I arrived in Australia, Forsyth's novel The Day of the Jackal hit the marketplace. It portrayed, among other things, a credible picture of the political landscape in France in 1963. In 1972, as I began teaching high school in South Australia, Forsyth's novel was made into a film. Twenty-five years later, in 1997, this spy-novel was made into a film again starring Bruce Willis as the hired assassin, as The Jackal. My life as a university student(1963-1967) and then as a teacher(1967-2005) has been bracketed by the events in this book and the two film versions that came after it. I saw the film for the second time last night many months after leaving my teaching role. This second viewing of a story that had its beginning at one of the historic junctures in Bahá’�* history, in 1963, gave rise to the following prose-poem. -Ron Price, "The Jackal," TDT:TV, 10:30-12:30 October 21st 2006.



    I often thought and felt there was

    some metaphorical quality to the

    themes of this book-film and I was

    reminded of it yet again last night

    as I watched The Jackal, as another

    Five Year Plan slipped into the second

    half of its first year and I slipped into

    the fourth year of late adulthood.



    A precisioned instrument is what one

    needs to be as Doug Martin put it back

    in '65 when I was 21 and as incapable

    then as now of assassinating my lower

    self, dispelling the darkness of the world

    of nature,(1) and driving it far, far, away.

    One takes one's attack to the very centre

    of the powers of the earth through a

    superhuman service(2) and a Plan one

    carries to one's death in this winter

    of unprecedented severity in these

    years of gathering storm clouds

    and the darkest hours before the dawn.



    1 'Abdu'l-Baha, Tablets of the Divine Plan, USA, 1977, 1p.67 and 2p.22.



    Ron Price

    October 22nd 2006

    ______________

    That's all folks!

  15. #15
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    My first post is just to confirm my favourite British film. Not only is it well acted but stays very close to the original book.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Country: UK Windthrop's Avatar
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    It was certainly a lot better than the, pointless, remake - but then again how often does a director of Zinneman's standing direct a thriller. Nowadays there would be too much interference from actor/'producers'

  17. #17
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Windthrop
    It was certainly a lot better than the, pointless, remake - but then again how often does a director of Zinneman's standing direct a thriller. Nowadays there would be too much interference from actor/'producers'
    The 'remake' wasn't even a real remake. It bears no relation to the book or the original film and is terrible!



    Bats.

  18. #18
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    I thought the book and Edward Fox's film were top notch, and stand as an all too rare example of a book and film being good companions. It can be done!

  19. #19
    Super Moderator Country: UK christoph404's Avatar
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    yep, Day of The jackal is a great film and has stood the test of time, everyone in the cast is like a who's who of great british actors of the period, Derek Jacobi, Alan Badel, Eric Porter,Anton Rogers etc... and of course Edward Fox. It really is a good example of a well made thriller,superbly acted and filmed. One finds oneself rooting for this cold blooded ruthless killer to succeed even though we know he will not!! its a great example of how a film can bend our emotions and thoughts from our normal instincts and maintain a tension throughout even though we know the inevitable outcome, its just brilliantly done.

  20. #20
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by christoph404
    yep, Day of The jackal is a great film and has stood the test of time, everyone in the cast is like a who's who of great british actors of the period, Derek Jacobi, Alan Badel, Eric Porter,Anton Rogers etc... and of course Edward Fox. It really is a good example of a well made thriller,superbly acted and filmed. One finds oneself rooting for this cold blooded ruthless killer to succeed even though we know he will not!! its a great example of how a film can bend our emotions and thoughts from our normal instincts and maintain a tension throughout even though we know the inevitable outcome, its just brilliantly done.
    It is definitely Edward Fox's best performance. I usually find him quite irritating but he is extremely effective as The Jackal. His aloof persona and cold demeanour are perfect.



    The excellent Michael Kitchen gave a similar performance in The Last Contract, a film well worth watching



    Bats.

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