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  1. #1
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    Hi there



    can anyone tell me what make and model the silver car used in The ladykillers was? It is one of the ones used to block the road?



    Many thanks scarf

  2. #2
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    Who`s car in which film?

  3. #3
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    Sorry forgot to add my reply , still getting used to the site.

    If you're talking about the orginal film the car used to block the path of the van round the side of Kings Cross station is a 1950 Studebaker.

    Circa1972 :)

  4. #4
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    Like many, I have only ever seen this film on TV. There is one part which has always puzzled me. The character Louis says something to the Professor, I think he calls him "crazy", and then there is a dramatic close up of the back of Alec Guiness's head and at that point there is some kind of clumsy cut. Does anyone know what was edited out and why ?

  5. #5
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    Yes Tony I know exactly the bit you mean re: the shot of Alec Guinness' head.

    I have played this bit over and over looking for the meaning of it all .I'm sorry I can't help you with it but I'm glad someone else is mystified as well . I find it a bit sinister .

    John

  6. #6
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    Yes that's a very strange scene, made more sinister by a bit of 'manic' music at that point.

    My view of the meaning of it is this : Louis is completely against the idea of involving Mrs Wilberforce in their plan and says something about sounding 'like it's been thought up by someone in a nuthouse!' . Then we see the back of the professor's head slowly turning round to face Louis and the look on Louis's face turns to surprise and fear. He meant it as a term of expression but he suddenly realises he's unintentionally hit the nail on the head.

    And, of course, it sets up an advance warning for later in the film when Guinness really does lose it.



    That's my view anyway!!

  7. #7
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    Thanks John and Glynn for your input. It would seem that there may have been a little more on the subject of the Professor's past, either in the original script or in some early cut of the film. Obviously something was cut, but I still wonder what it was and if it was ever shown.



    Cheers

  8. #8
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    My favourite film - it is simply the best!



    ~au revoir,



    Chlse



    (Professor Marcus P.A.)

  9. #9
    Senior Member Country: UK Windthrop's Avatar
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    I didn't find it funny the first time I saw it when I was a secondary school (nobody else did either). It's a film that has grown on me over the years.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    I've always felt very affectionate to The Ladykillers because it was the first film I ever saw at the NFT c1982. And Charles Barr's analysis of it as being a parallet of the 1951 general election with Katie Johnson representing the Tories taking credit for Attlee's achievements was the first bit of film criticism that made me see a film in a totally new way.

  11. #11
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    A few years back I saw it on the big screen at the "Brooklyn Academy of Music" the tea party scene had a kind of balletic (?) quality to it, the gang seemed almost to be dancing with the old ladies. In it's field only equalled by the "Lavendar Hill Mob" and wasn't Mackendrick's next picture "Sweet Smell Of Success" - what a one two !!

  12. #12
    Senior Member Country: UK Windthrop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy bentley
    A few years back I saw it on the big screen at the "Brooklyn Academy of Music" the tea party scene had a kind of balletic (?) quality to it, the gang seemed almost to be dancing with the old ladies. In it's field only equalled by the "Lavendar Hill Mob" and wasn't Mackendrick's next picture "Sweet Smell Of Success" - what a one two !!
    Which was sadly when that fine director began to go wrong. He was spoilt at Ealing and when faced with big stars who had more power than he had he came unstuck.

  13. #13
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    He may well of "come unstuck" but that doesn't stop "Sweet Smell Of Success" being one of the greatest films ever made. I wonder how many American directors at that time would have taken on such a direct attack against Winchell ?

  14. #14
    Senior Member Country: UK Windthrop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy bentley
    He may well of "come unstuck" but that doesn't stop "Sweet Smell Of Success" being one of the greatest films ever made. I wonder how many American directors at that time would have taken on such a direct attack against Winchell ?
    I wasn't disputing its significance/merit just lamenting the point at which AM got into trouble. I do also note that his 3 60s films are not without merit. Like Welles and Powell he was so gifted he was a misfit in mainstream cinema and that he didn't do more was our loss.

  15. #15
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    Windthrop, my dear fellow, I didn't think that for a moment. My point was more what an incredible back to back brace of flicks A.M. directed. There aren't many directors, especialyy British ones that achieved such quality and range within the space of two pictures. I've not yet read "Lethal Innocence" but i'm closing in on it, with some relish.

  16. #16
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    Incredible new information there, chaps! Thank you :)

  17. #17
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    A High Wind In Jamaica is a favourite of mine.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Windthrop
    I didn't find it funny the first time I saw it when I was a secondary school (nobody else did either). It's a film that has grown on me over the years.
    That is a nice way of putting it(grown on me) all the Ealings should be watched and watched again. Another slow burner is the Maggie which is my personal fave

  19. #19
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevie boy
    That is a nice way of putting it(grown on me) all the Ealings should be watched and watched again. Another slow burner is the Maggie which is my personal fave
    Am I the only person who watches The Maggie and is on the side of Paul Douglas?

  20. #20
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman
    Am I the only person who watches The Maggie and is on the side of Paul Douglas?
    I am! I don't understand why we're meant to dislike him. All he wants is to get his furniture transported and it's clear that the crew are incompetent rogues. Why should we think their boat is more important than his bathroom? I can't understand why anyone wouldn't sympathise with him. It's not like he's trying to stop them getting their whisky. To me the film makes no sense at at all especially when you compare the attitude Mackendrick shows to Douglas' character with his oft-quoted sympathy with Waggett in Whisky Galore (though obviously that doesn't quite tie in with what we see onscreen in the earlier film).

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