Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 49 of 49

Thread: Fahrenheit 451

  1. #41
    Senior Member Country: Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,086
    Liked
    28 times
    I was re-watching my DVD of Fahrenheit 451 last night, and noticed that Cyril Cusack was the fireman Captain, i.e. Montag's boss. I'd never known who he was before, but it turns out that he played the hitch-hiker, many years later, in the Tales of the Unexpected episode:

    http://filmdope.com/forums/br...xpected-4.html

  2. #42
    Senior Member Country: Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,086
    Liked
    28 times
    At the end of the film, the book people are reciting something that contains the phrase "After the day is done". Having just admitted yesterday that I'm rabidly anti-religion, I'll have to eat twenty cubic tonnes of humble pie and ask where it comes from, as it sounds vaguely religious. Though I dislike religion, I am fascinated by language, hence my interest in that phrase. I can also tell you that next year is the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible, and the Royal Mint will be issuing a two pound coin to celebrate it - the Mint hasn't announced it yet but will do soon.

  3. #43
    GRAEME
    Guest
    Not religious, so you can relax. It's from The Walrus and The Carpenter by Lewis Carroll:

    The moon was shining sulkily,
    Because she thought the sun
    Had got no business to be there
    After the day was done--
    "It's very rude of him," she said,
    "To come and spoil the fun!"

  4. #44
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by GRAEME View Post
    Not religious, so you can relax. It's from The Walrus and The Carpenter by Lewis Carroll:
    The Walrus and The Carpenter
    Were walking hand in hand.
    If only, said the Carpenter,
    The law would understand



    Steve

  5. #45
    Senior Member Country: Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,086
    Liked
    28 times
    Quote Originally Posted by GRAEME View Post
    Not religious, so you can relax. It's from The Walrus and The Carpenter by Lewis Carroll:
    Thanks, Graeme. Always wondered about that one. Now I won't have to eat that twenty cubic tonnes of humble pie - yippee!

  6. #46
    Senior Member Country: Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,086
    Liked
    28 times
    Quote Originally Posted by cally View Post
    Notoriously despite after the success of Jules Et Jim earlier, Werner and Truffaut didn't get along on the set of Fahrenheit 451 and in the end they communicated via a third party. They never worked or spoke to each other ever after.
    According to the commentary on my DVD, after doing Jules et Jim, Oskar Werner had gone to Hollywood and become a big star as a result of appearing in "Ship of Fools", so he came to the set of Fahrenheit 451 with an attitude to match, telling Julie Christie and the other actors how he thought they should deliver their lines. Werner's diction is atrocious in parts, so we barely get to hear Bradbury's immortal line, "We burn the books to ashes, and then we burn the ashes".

    Director Truffaut could speak little English and had to rely on intermediaries during the filming of Fahrenheit 451 .The film was misunderstood and heavily criticised on its release, with some suggestions that Truffaut couldn't handle English dialogue. The rather stylised acting and dialogue (which works for me) is meant to suggest the dumbing down and repression of people who are not allowed to read books. Truffaut apparently thought that the audience is always right, so he never made another English language film. Perhaps his dismay at its reception led to his refusal to allow it to be re-issued during his lifetime.

  7. #47
    Senior Member Country: Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,086
    Liked
    28 times
    More factoids. Apparently paper does not catch fire at 451 degrees Fahrenheit, but burns at 450 degrees Celsius.

    Author Ray Bradbury maintained that Fahrenheit 451 was his only science fiction story; his "Martian Chronicles" were "a myth", he claimed. Director Truffaut famously disliked sci-fi, despite appearing in Close Encounters, and regarded Fahrenheit 451 as a "fable". For me, the story is above all a political one, of the human spirit fighting a repressive system. The sci-fi element is actually played down in the film. Bradbury complained that the mechanical hound used to hunt down Montag was not used in the film.

    The trappings used in the film are often deliberately old-fashioned - for instance the many vintage telephones seen in the film. The ending, where the state is using men in hoverpacks to hunt Montag from the skies, jars for me, as the clunky effects do not match the production values of the rest of the film, which up till then has concentrated rather on the psychological.

  8. #48
    GRAEME
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by icetorch View Post
    More factoids. Apparently paper does not catch fire at 451 degrees Fahrenheit, but burns at 450 degrees Celsius.

    Author Ray Bradbury maintained that Fahrenheit 451 was his only science fiction story; his "Martian Chronicles" were "a myth", he claimed. Director Truffaut famously disliked sci-fi, despite appearing in Close Encounters, and regarded Fahrenheit 451 as a "fable".
    What exactly stops a SF story from being a "fable" as well - are these catagories mutually exclusive? And Farenheit 451 may be his only science fiction novel - but he has certainly written many SF short stories over the years. The Martian Chronicles is mostly made up of several of these adapted and tied loosely together.

    This is an old old story... and a feeble one! The more arty people get the more they deny their obvious SF work is not actually SF.

    The most recent was Cormac McCarthy and The Road. Unmistakably a high-end literary post-apocalyptic genre piece - but not according to its author! Margaret Atwood tries to crawl out from under the label for her The Handmaid's Tale and Oryx & Krake.

    It's part of the bug-eyed monsters/little green men snobbery against SF as a genre. If it is literature (or "Art Movie") it can't be SF.

    Bull.

    Anyway, in Ray Bradbury's case - it depends when he said it - he's been quite bonkers for some time now!

  9. #49
    Senior Member Country: UK frame69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,073
    Liked
    15 times
    Just started watching this on Sky Classics.

    Frame.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Similar Threads

  1. Fahrenheit 451
    By Mark O in forum Film Locations
    Replies: 57
    Last Post: 03-08-10, 06:14 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts