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Thread: Fahrenheit 451

  1. #1
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    I have a copy of Fahrenheit 451 on DVD and as I'm trying to learn French at the moment thought I'd turn on the french language audio track; does anyone know if Julie Christie voiced her own dialogue in French as it sounds really like her voice? I believe she does speak the language fluently having lived in France at one time.



    Cheers

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    I just got in her 1981 MEMOIRS OF A SURVIVOR, and her French-speaking looks awfully sync'd up to be dubbed.



    Could they have possibly shot the film twice, a la the 1930's films?



    No, certainly they wouldn't have done THAT?!! Just because Laurel & Hardy used to do 4 re-shoots, in French, German and Spanish - look where that got them!

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    The short answer is I don't know - but before becoming an actress Julie was looking to work as an interpreter having studied languages including French, so there is a fair chance she would have used French. I believe she spoke to Truffaut in French constantly during the shoot.

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    I think this should definitely be included here as this was a classic and one film which does even to this day have a hold on me and one film i could watch many times but never get bored of it. I think it is the music which also helped make this film a truly worthwhile masterpiece also with the skill of direction from Francois Truffaut.

    Imagine an age where books are banned and it would be an offence to own or even be caught reading a book, and where Fireman are employed to burn books or properties which have been found to be holding vast libraries instead of putting out fires.

  5. #5
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    Humanities books lie open with their metaphysical flies undone

    Impervious to the ocean's tides and Fahrenheit Four Five One......



    A couple of lines from a poem I wrote in 2000 about the Internet called 'Interface'



    Yes, it is a film to make you think about a possible dystopian future!

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Country: UK christoph404's Avatar
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    I think this should definitely be included here as this was a classic and one film which does even to this day have a hold on me and one film i could watch many times but never get bored of it. I think it is the music which also helped make this film a truly worthwhile masterpiece also with the skill of direction from Francois Truffaut.

    Imagine an age where books are banned and it would be an offence to own or even be caught reading a book, and where Fireman are employed to burn books or properties which have been found to be holding vast libraries instead of putting out fires.
    Have you read the book by Ray Bradbury? If you enjoyed the film you would certainly enjoy the novel. Bradbury was furious with Michael Moore for what he considered a plundering of his book title for Moore's film "Fahrenheit 911" Bradbury tried to stop Moore using it but was unable to, I think he had a point myself. The film is great but apparently on set filming was tense as Oskar Werner had a big falling out with director Truffaut early on and the animosity remained till the end. There is a story that Werner changed his hairstyle mid filming to deliberately cause continuity problems, whether thats true or not I don't know. The director was French speaking, luckily for Julie Christie she could speak French! It was the only English language film directed by Truffaut and he had written a script of the film before fully mastering the English language, he is reputed to have been dissapointed by the stilted dialogue in the English speaking version and preferred the dubbed French language version which he supervised. Terence Stamp was originally going to play Montag but ducked out of it at the last minute! And the music is indeed superb, composed by Bernard Hermann who's other credits include Taxi Driver, North by North West, Cape Fear, The Day the Earth Stood Still, to name a few.

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    Have you read the book by Ray Bradbury? If you enjoyed the film you would certainly enjoy the novel. Bradbury was furious with Michael Moore for what he considered a plundering of his book title for Moore's film "Fahrenheit 911" Bradbury tried to stop Moore using it but was unable to, I think he had a point myself.
    Unfortunately Keats was dead when Bradbury wrote Golden Apples of the Sun, so was Shakespeare when Ray penned Something Wicked This Way Comes and so was Walt Whitman when he wrote I Sing the Body Electric.



    As an admirer of the book I was disappointed with the film. What Bradbury intended as an attack on McCarthyism and 50s America became, under Truffaut, something that seemed to be about the occupation of France. When I first read the book I envisaged someone like Lumet tackling it and casting Brando as Montag and Steiger as The Captain - and with the robot dog!



    D.

  8. #8
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    Some of this was filmed up the road from where I live - the old 60s looking flats are in Roehampton in SW London.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Country: UK christoph404's Avatar
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    its interesting looking at some of the futuristic designs in the film, I remember watching the film in the 70s and thinking that the large flat TV screen on the wall of Montags house, above the fireplace and center piece of the room was a bit far fetched! Who would have thought eh?

  10. #10
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    I think this was Truffaut's only English language film? Am I right?

  11. #11
    Super Moderator Country: UK christoph404's Avatar
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    I think this was Truffaut's only English language film? Am I right?
    yes quite right, as I mentioned earlier Truffaut was reportedly not happy with the English speaking version and preferred the dubbed French language version.

  12. #12
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    I think this film is rather beautiful and the stilted form of dialogue actually goes some way towards achieving that - who knows how conversation and dialect would suffer in a society without the written word? A wonderful conceit when you think about it and missed, I think, by Bradbury in his novel. And that wonderful scene where Werner reads aloud from David Copperfield in a cracked, broken voice - not to mention one of the most moving end-pieces in cinematic history.



    A classic indeed.



    Thank God Terence Stamp dropped out.

  13. #13
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    Hi,



    I Watched the region 2 DVD realease of Fahrenheit 451 last night and noticed something strange.



    There's a scene where the firemen are searching people for books in a kids playground and at around 39:20 whatever is happening on the left hand side of the screen is blocked out by a black band which appears from the left and stays there for a few seconds and then goes away.



    While this happens the musics gets a little dramatic too.



    Is this something being censored out for some reason....It's the only explaination I can think of.



    Does anyone who's seen this or has a copy of the DVD know why this is?



    Thanks.

  14. #14
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    As far as I recall it, this was a little stylistic flourish from Truffaut to indicate that Big Brother had censored part of that image, in keeping with the theme of the movie.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for the replies,



    I was hoping it wasn't some kind of post production censorship as seen in the first story of The vault of horror, but having read the thread on the IMBD forum all is explained.

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    This is one film where comments on are fairly sparse but one I love to watch from time to time. I still have the recording I made on VHS from the early 90s on C4. Love it or hate it, anyone care to start the ball rolling?

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    I'll roll.



    Pains me to say this, because several Truffaut films are among my all-time faves, and I am a big sci-fi/fantasy fan, a lit lover. Most of it leaves me cold, often irritated, after repeated viewings. (Even with Julie Christie in two roles!!) And yet the ending is an absolute stunner. Lyrical, affecting, poetic, optimistic.

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    Pains me to say this, because several Truffaut films are among my all-time faves, and I am a big sci-fi/fantasy fan, a lit lover. Most of it leaves me cold, often irritated, after repeated viewings. (Even with Julie Christie in two roles!!) And yet the ending is an absolute stunner. Lyrical, affecting, poetic, optimistic.
    If you had to, what particular novel, biography, fact of fiction would you choose to keep inside your nut?



    Come on everyone, join in the fun!

  19. #19
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    Back to Fahrenheit 451, I love the photography mostly. There are many striking moments, not least the surprisingly emotional ending (which is a bit far-fetched!), Bee Duffell defiantly sacrificing her life as she can't live without her books, Anton Diffring dressed up as a woman (!), and those extraordinary images of the pages turning during the inferno. Strangely, as a book-lover myself, I found the sight of that blue stuff being squirted on them more upsetting than the almost beautiful look of the fire.



    A nice publicity picture of the main stars, Oskar Werner and Julie Christie.




  20. #20
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    I adore this film. It's a very sixties vision of the future, but that's nothing bad as 1984 gave us a very 40's future and made it work.



    The film has a very sensual edge, on the mono-rail (fabulous itself) boys stroke themselves, girls kiss their reflections. Only Montag seems out of touch with touching and set apart from the off.



    I like Werner's performance a lot - he appears cold, detached, often stupid. But he grows as he becomes secretive, and the scene where he reads aloud that small passage from David Copperfield in broken English is utterly beautiful.



    Bernard Herrmann's score is lovely, and really embeds itself into that final unforgettable scene, one of the finest in cinema.



    There's one thing I think which makes this film an absolute masterpiece, it's an idea that I find so striking that I still wonder about it no matter how many times I see the film - it's when the appliances stop working for Montag. The fireman's pole won't work, the door of his house won't open, technology turns against him after he learns to read. As a metaphor for a burgeoning outsider it's fair, but it's so beautifully handled by Werner - he appears genuinely bewildered, only wily evil Cyril Cusack has imagination to make the connection.



    Love it, I'm off to watch it again.

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