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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimR
    This is a very well made and evocative film. I found it disturbing at the time; I couldn't sleep for several nights.
    I think I must have originally seen this on its first TV screening, on BBC1 on a Sunday night if I'm not mistaken! Anyway it finished too late so I only saw about half of it, and I was too young to appreciate it, but I too found it somewhat eerie for reasons I cannot explain ... I think much of this had to do with the truly wonderful score, amongst the greatest I've heard (but then I also love Richard Rodney Bennett's music for Billion Dollar Brain, which is one of those films you're not supposed to like but which I absolutely love!).



    Seeing it now, it remains a strangely disturbing tale ... truly beautiful, on the surface at least ...



    It's a shame the DVD is only 4:3 full frame, rather than the 16:9 promised on the cover ...

  2. #22
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    I don't know if Joseph Losey is considered as "british" director in Great Britain, but he is one I do like most.

    Such great pictures are: The Criminal, The Servant, Accident, Boom, Secret Ceremony, Modesty Blaise, and for me above all is The Go-Between.....

    It's a sad story in a way, because Leo, the little boy is hurt for life by what happened this summer (a hot one!). As a man (M.Redgrave), returning in Norfolk, you feel how he was "marked" by this part of his youth, and how he "missed" his life, maybe because of this......

    He was a messenger for something he didn't understand, and that "pertubed" him a lot ; but no one cares. On contrary, the two women, mother and daughter happened to be very "hard" with him ( as if wearing a norfolk jacket in summer is not even enough !)

    Beautiful scenes when J.Christie talks with Leo, when she plays piano with A.Bates singing.....

    Moonfleet. ("the exercise was benefitial")

  3. #23
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  4. #24
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    I love The Go-Between - the music, the shoes clattering up the wooden staircase, the thrum of the Norfolk heat ("Warm weather suit you?"), the beauty of Christie, even though she is far too old, the perfection of Edward Fox ("Or Trimingham if you prefer"), and that whole Edwardian scene. BUT.



    The ending is absolute rubbish, isn't it? It makes no sense at all. Why does Mrs Maudesley force Leo to the out-houses? What on earth is her motive? And what on earth is that last scene about? Christie saying, "I was Lady Trimingham, you see. There is no other." So who is the grandson? Why is he living at the Hall? Why isn't one of Maudesley's sons living there with his family? Did the Triminghams buy the Maudesleys out? It just makes no sense at all. The novel does rather clarify things - everyone dies in the war and of disease - but that's not the point. Pinter and Losey simply bungled it.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colonel Blimp
    I think I must have originally seen this on its first TV screening, on BBC1 on a Sunday night if I'm not mistaken! Anyway it finished too late so I only saw about half of it, and I was too young to appreciate it, but I too found it somewhat eerie for reasons I cannot explain ... I think much of this had to do with the truly wonderful score, amongst the greatest I've heard (but then I also love Richard Rodney Bennett's music for Billion Dollar Brain, which is one of those films you're not supposed to like but which I absolutely love!).



    Seeing it now, it remains a strangely disturbing tale ... truly beautiful, on the surface at least ...



    It's a shame the DVD is only 4:3 full frame, rather than the 16:9 promised on the cover ...
    I haven't seen it in more than thirty years. I don't know how it would look now to me - at the time it was very disturbing. I would agree completely with the term "somewhat eerie for reasons I cannot explain". Usually I don't care for Pinter and his sinister interpretations of everyday events. But this was an exception.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdrianTurner
    I love The Go-Between - the music, the shoes clattering up the wooden staircase, the thrum of the Norfolk heat ("Warm weather suit you?"), the beauty of Christie, even though she is far too old, the perfection of Edward Fox ("Or Trimingham if you prefer"), and that whole Edwardian scene. BUT.



    The ending is absolute rubbish, isn't it? It makes no sense at all. Why does Mrs Maudesley force Leo to the out-houses? What on earth is her motive? And what on earth is that last scene about? Christie saying, "I was Lady Trimingham, you see. There is no other." So who is the grandson? Why is he living at the Hall? Why isn't one of Maudesley's sons living there with his family? Did the Triminghams buy the Maudesleys out? It just makes no sense at all. The novel does rather clarify things - everyone dies in the war and of disease - but that's not the point. Pinter and Losey simply bungled it.
    I really should see it again. I do remember the film's ending was odd and confusing, but I think the whole film was odd. Mrs. Maudesley was a frightening character: so filled with not-so-suppressed rage that she seemed a little crazy. Margaret Leighton was so compelling that I can remember her performance vividly now, but she was very, very odd.



    As for Julie Christie being "far too old".....



    She was about 30 at the time and dazzling. The boy's infatuation with her and willingness to obey her is entirely believable. If she were less dazzling, it would not be.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimR

    As for Julie Christie being "far too old".....
    In the novel, Miss Marion Maudesley is about 17.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Cairns
    Interesting article. You have a very well-designed blog.



    What do you mean by "otherness"?

  9. #29
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdrianTurner
    In the novel, Miss Marion Maudesley is about 17.
    I don't know the book. If you are saying it is not faithful to the book, that is a fair point - but the age difference worked very well in the film. She was spectacular looking, but also remote and fascinating.

  10. #30
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    The score, by Michel Legrand, is my all-time favourite. When the film came out, several of the critics said the flash-forwards (rainy, gloomy 50s Norfolk, contrasting with the glorious summer of decades before) didn't work well. As far as I'm concerned they work wonderfully.

  11. #31
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomDaws
    The score, by Michel Legrand, is my all-time favourite. When the film came out, several of the critics said the flash-forwards (rainy, gloomy 50s Norfolk, contrasting with the glorious summer of decades before) didn't work well. As far as I'm concerned they work wonderfully.
    That would be late 60s rainy, gloomy Norfolk. Norfolk's much nicer than the 'flash forwards' suggest.

  12. #32
    Senior Member Country: UK Wee Sonny MacGregor's Avatar
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    The biography of the author of The Go-Between - L P Hartley - is worth tracking down. It's called "Foreign Country" and is written by Adrian Wright. Hartley was certainly a rum un. He was educated at Harrow and Oxford but a family investment in a brickworks at Whittlesey meant that Hartley never had to work. His cousin had a note written by Hartley in 1909 to his mother when he was 13 and spending the weekend at the home of a friend at Bradenham House, a mansion near Thetford in Norfolk. Part of it read "On Saturday we had a ball. Very grand indeed. at least not very. We always have late dinner here. There is going to be a cricket match today, the hall against the village. I am going to socre." Hartley found the note years later and it provided the inspiration for The Go-Between.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman
    That would be late 60s rainy, gloomy Norfolk. Norfolk's much nicer than the 'flash forwards' suggest.
    Filmed in around 1970, but what I meant was the story at that point is set in the 50s. Sorry - should have been clearer.

  14. #34
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomDaws
    Filmed in around 1970, but what I meant was the story at that point is set in the 50s. Sorry - should have been clearer.
    My godmother is in some of carriage driving scenes (she and her husband were top carriage drivers). We watched a bit of the filming in and around Norwich.

  15. #35
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    Did you know that Richard Gibson, who played young Leo's friend, went on to appear as Herr Flick in 'Allo 'Allo ? I was at drama school with him. I gather he's now a journalist.

  16. #36
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    I think you can't compare, in matter of taste, a film adapted from a novel and the novel. Because, by definition (... lots of "tion" in this speach !) the writer is an artist, the director is an artist (in best cases), so each one can hold his own universe. Fidelity is most in "spirit" than in facts...

    John Huston "trancended" the Kipling story for "The Man Who...", if I remember, the"Francs-Ma�ons" background wasn't in the book.

    From few pages, Huston has done a movie masterpiece .

    Nabokov did the screenplay of"Lolita", but said he didn't agree with Kubrick's final result...but the film got "another dimension", because for example, there are James Mason, Shelley Winters, Sue Lyon, Peter Sellers in it (...don't explain)

    I don't remember if the "ping-pong" scene is in the book, but it's one of my favorite ever, with a mythical Mason/ Sellers encounter !!

    A great laugh every time.

    M.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomDaws
    Did you know that Richard Gibson, who played young Leo's friend, went on to appear as Herr Flick in 'Allo 'Allo ? I was at drama school with him. I gather he's now a journalist.
    I met him just after the filming when we were staying in the same digs in Windsor. He told me the young lead actor in THE GO BETWEEN was not allowed to actually witness the scene in the barn because he was under age. Instead he had to look at mark. He thought it was unfair. Apparently everyone - Julie Christie, Alan Bates included - thought that was unfair too: "Why can't Dominic watch the f***ing scene?"

  18. #38
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sippog
    I met him just after the filming when we were staying in the same digs in Windsor. He told me the young lead actor in THE GO BETWEEN was not allowed to actually witness the scene in the barn because he was under age. Instead he had to look at mark. He thought it was unfair. Apparently everyone - Julie Christie, Alan Bates included - thought that was unfair too: "Why can't Dominic watch the f***ing scene?"
    ...Because if he had watching it, he would'nt have done the rest of the movie !

    M.

  19. #39
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    I think this film is almost my favourite film ever .It is the sort of film you can watch over and over and always notice something new in the characters ,the acting or the scenery .



    Dominic Guard is wonderful as the boy Leo and Julie Christie and Alan Bates perfect as the ill-fated lovers .



    The parts of the story told from Leos point of view when he is older capture that era many years later so well .



    The musical score by Michael Legrand and the photography are also wonderful.

  20. #40
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    Now that film had a great location, it's a large house you can see at a distance and I think it's at Melton Constable if my memory is correct?

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