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Thread: Terence Fisher

  1. #1
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    Hi there



    Has anybody a photo of Terence Fisher, I just want to know what he looks like...

    Thanks

    M.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Country: Fiji
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    Look him up in the Directors section of Britmovie and you will find one- he always reminded me of an affable old uncle...



    Top man.



    Smudge

  3. #3
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smudge
    Look him up in the Directors section of Britmovie and you will find one- he always reminded me of an affable old uncle...

    Top man.

    Smudge
    Oh yes, I didn't remember he was there

    Thanks



    Moon.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Terence Fisher Hammer director suffered from alcoholisim -(which it is claimed affected his ability and insureability to find work) - does anyone know what was root cause iof his drink problem -was it personal strife, Studio pressure , or was he just a recreational drinker who got addicted?

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Country: UK christoph404's Avatar
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    Maybe a combination of all three of those things, very difficult to pinpoint the causes of alcoholism in an individual without going through their life history with them and reviewing their drinking habits. My late father was a serious alcoholic, a disease which brought his life to a premature end and to this day I still can't work out what was the root cause and I've really looked into it and tried to find out over the years by talking to relatives and family friends and business associates. There is a theory that if you come from an alcoholic background you have a preposition to become one yourself, perhaps Terence Fisher just liked to drink and went to lots of film world parties where alcohol was freely available. Stress can certainly lead you to quench the trauma with a drink, most of us who enjoy a beer now and again can appreciate a quick pint and a bag of crisps after a hard week at work, I guess the problem starts when a quick pint on a friday night becomes 5 or 6 pints every night and so on.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain GoggleboxUK's Avatar
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    There's also fetal alcohol syndrome, a condition where a person is 'primed' for alcoholism when their mother drinks during pregnancy.



    I know someone who has both older and younger siblings, the offspring of an alcoholic mother who only drank whilst carrying my friend. He is an alcoholic whilst his 2 siblings are unaffected.



    It's a crying shame that it's a problem that is mainly hidden away. I'm sure if more high profile celebrities were open about their struggles with alcohol addiction there'd be a lot more money available for researching treatment.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by christoph404
    Maybe a combination of all three of those things, very difficult to pinpoint the causes of alcoholism in an individual without going through their life history with them and reviewing their drinking habits. My late father was a serious alcoholic, a disease which brought his life to a premature end and to this day I still can't work out what was the root cause and I've really looked into it and tried to find out over the years by talking to relatives and family friends and business associates. There is a theory that if you come from an alcoholic background you have a preposition to become one yourself, perhaps Terence Fisher just liked to drink and went to lots of film world parties where alcohol was freely available. Stress can certainly lead you to quench the trauma with a drink, most of us who enjoy a beer now and again can appreciate a quick pint and a bag of crisps after a hard week at work, I guess the problem starts when a quick pint on a friday night becomes 5 or 6 pints every night and so on.


    Intresting -my father was also alcholic (but moderately) -i know the causes.Firstly when he came to UK he lodged with Sikhs- and boy can they drink.He was also under pressure as he was first of his family to come to UK and had to "morally" provide for his family back home .I suppose he found after trying his first drink that he could forget about his problems.

    However, all my brothers/sisters are all teetotal.

    With Fisher and any famous person who is alcoholic i'm always fascinated to find the key trigger event -if there was one.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Country: United States will.15's Avatar
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    Not everyone who is a drinker, even a heavy one, is an alcoholic. I can't recall who it was, but I recently read some celebrity claimed to be an alcoholic, but he had a drinking problem in his youth, a long time ago, quickly put an end to it entirely by himself without suffering any problems, and still drinks today at social functions. That's not an alcoholic, but apparently he gets some satisfaction calling himself one.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by will.15
    That's not an alcoholic, but apparently he gets some satisfaction calling himself one.
    There are also people who seem to 'enjoy' claiming to have a mental illness. A few years ago it was 'trendy' to claim to have schizophenia. I used to deal with a lot of people, mostly young men who were suffering varying degress of angst, claiming to have the illness. It was easy to sort out people with genuinely serious problems because the 'fakers' generally hadn't a clue about the real early symptoms of the illness and went completely OTT. Lately it's been bi-polar disorder, a situation no doubt encouraged by the publicity surrounding high profile sufferers such as Robbie Williams and Stephen Fry.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Country: UK Mr Sloane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman
    There are also people who seem to 'enjoy' claiming to have a mental illness. A few years ago it was 'trendy' to claim to have schizophenia. I used to deal with a lot of people, mostly young men who were suffering varying degress of angst, claiming to have the illness. It was easy to sort out people with genuinely serious problems because the 'fakers' generally hadn't a clue about the real early symptoms of the illness and went completely OTT. Lately it's been bi-polar disorder, a situation no doubt encouraged by the publicity surrounding high profile sufferers such as Robbie Williams and Stephen Fry.
    Yes, unfortunately some people think by claiming an addiction or an illness they absolve themselves of all their actions.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Country: UK Windthrop's Avatar
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    I remember reading that Melvyn Bragg said that he used an abstinence system to protect against addiction (avoiding drink for a first month of every year, first week of every month, first day of every week IIRC) because being in media/showbiz exposed people to alot of free drink.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain scenesixty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by will.15
    Not everyone who is a drinker, even a heavy one, is an alcoholic. I can't recall who it was, but I recently read some celebrity claimed to be an alcoholic, but he had a drinking problem in his youth, a long time ago, quickly put an end to it entirely by himself without suffering any problems, and still drinks today at social functions. That's not an alcoholic, but apparently he gets some satisfaction calling himself one.
    A very complex illness; I had a very good friend and work colleague who died from liver failure I tried very hard to get her professional help-but she wouldn't have any of it.. it's very sad. Regardless of socio-economic class it's a widespread and serious illness, that needs to be addressed as soon as-Best to all.

  13. #13
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    It's an occupational hazard particularly in the acting profession where drinking seemed to be as much part of the job as the actual acting. I met a little known tv actor who also does voice-overs last year - drank like a proverbial fish.

    Many of the old school actors were well known as heavy drinkers. Many of us can probably think of at least 10 famous actors who had a known drink problem. In the days before the popularity of cocaine, cannabis and other drugs this was the favoured relaxant. Many drank to stave off stage-fright.



    But it is a complex illness. When my brother went into rehab, doctors tried to determine whether he was a social drinker who got addicted, whether he drank because he was depressed, or whether the drinking caused his depression. They usually go hand in hand and create a viscious circle which is difficult to get out of and difficult to treat.



    I am always wary of 'recovering' alchoholics who manage to drink socially still. Like the person who has quit smoking, but has an occasional cigarette I think they are just kidding themselves or that they weren't alchoholics in the first place!

  14. #14
    Senior Member Country: United States will.15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacobean
    I am always wary of 'recovering' alchoholics who manage to drink socially still. Like the person who has quit smoking, but has an occasional cigarette I think they are just kidding themselves or that they weren't alchoholics in the first place!
    This is a little off-topic, but smoking cigarettes, unike drinking, is believed to be physically addictive for everyone who does it regularely. My grandfather smoked for decades and suddenly stopped, not for health reasons, but because of a price increase (back in the 1970's). I was later told he never smoked more than one or two cigarettes a day. Is that unusual or do you know of other long time light smokers who didn't develop a tobacco addiction?

  15. #15
    Senior Member Country: Spain Rowdon's Avatar
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    I smoked about twenty a day for twenty years from 16 to 36 . Then stopped. Haven't had one since (11 years). My wife gave up at the same time, and can do three or four a week, or none, or two a day, or whatever. She's lucky. If I start again, I'll start again properly ... ooh I can just feel the way a soft pack of Luckies feels as you tap it on the table and the ciggies start to poke upwards out of the pack, saying "Smooooke meeeee...smooooke meeee" like that plant in Little Shop of Horrors. I think I'm a smoker who doesn't smoke, and my wife's a non-smoker who smokes.



    As for Terence Fisher's alcoholism, my parents were both in the industry (behind the camera) from the late 40s to the late 70s, and my impression was that it was unusual not to be an alcoholic if you were in films.

    I don't remember there being any single events that pushed any of my parents' crowd into alcoholism, but I do remember that they all seemed like a lot of fun, all the time, however irresponsible that sounds.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by will.15
    This is a little off-topic, but smoking cigarettes, unike drinking, is believed to be physically addictive for everyone who does it regularely. My grandfather smoked for decades and suddenly stopped, not for health reasons, but because of a price increase (back in the 1970's). I was later told he never smoked more than one or two cigarettes a day. Is that unusual or do you know of other long time light smokers who didn't develop a tobacco addiction?
    That does seem unusual although for the time, probably not, as you were allowed to smoke indoors then, but nowadays what is the point when you have to stand out in the cold and rain. It's when people say they don't smoke, but have the occasional cigarette that gets my goat. If you smoke, you're a smoker.



    I must sound like a born again non-smoker, but actually I used to smoke occasionally myself and stopped when the ban in the pubs came along. I actually miss the welcoming fugg of smoke upon entering a boozer on a cold wet night. The ban has done a lot of damage to the pub industry.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Country: UK Joe Fraguela's Avatar
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    I decided to quit smoking in July this year after 25 years of smoking. I'd been thinking about it for sometime and I finally made my mind up that I wanted to give up.



    I had seen the TV adverts for the NHS quit smoking service so I went to the Doctors who referred me to my local hospital in Edgware.



    They talked me through the various products they have to help you quit and after having a chat with a counsellor I started the 6 week programme and chose the patches. Starting with the high dose patches and then after 2 weeks changing to the middle dose patches and then after another 2 weeks changing to the low dose patches. I never had a cigarette during this time and after about 5 weeks I stopped using the patches and I haven't had a cigarette since I gave up and it's been nearly 5 months now.



    I don't regret ever smoking but I honestly didn't think that I would have the willpower or inclination to give up smoking but seeing how easy it was to give up with the aid of patches and being focused mentally my only wish is that I didn't give up earlier.

  18. #18
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    Terence Fisher Hammer director suffered from alcoholisim -(which it is claimed affected his ability and insureability to find work) - does anyone know what was root cause iof his drink problem -was it personal strife, Studio pressure , or was he just a recreational drinker who got addicted?
    Interesting - theres nothing of this in the various books on Hammer. He was seriously injured twice in car accidents (hit by a car crossing the road) which prevented him directing Dracula Has Risen From the Grave and Lust for a vampire.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Country: UK Windyridge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tali122
    Terence Fisher Hammer director suffered from alcoholisim -(which it is claimed affected his ability and insureability to find work) - does anyone know what was root cause iof his drink problem -was it personal strife, Studio pressure , or was he just a recreational drinker who got addicted?
    Alcoholism is a disease which most recovering alcoholics believe has always been in them. Typically, alcoholics will display needy behaviour and other compulsions to use food, sex etc to change the way they feel, or escape from problems, years before they even take a drink. It is believed that it's a progressive illness which always gets worse, never better. Different people "cross the line" to alcoholic drinking at different times. The only cure is thought to be total abstinence, as true alcoholics cannot control their drinking - the first drink sets off a craving and compulsion to carry on. There's no stop button.

  20. #20
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    I've read a lot of Hammer books and also have found very little mention of a drinking problem with Terence Fisher (most recently Wayne Kinsey's Hammer Films: The Bray Studios Years). What does come across is how loved Fisher was by those he worked with, which would explain their reticence in talking about the subject even years after his death.



    John Gilling, on the other hand, would shout and scream and rant, with the result that people are queueing up to tell stories about him. Good director, though.

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