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  1. #21
    Senior Member Country: Vietnam hankoler's Avatar
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    A great film but Iv'e said this before about this film , at the end, they move from the house with the grandchild into a flat , not something I would choose to do.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by hankoler
    A great film but Iv'e said this before about this film , at the end, they move from the house with the grandchild into a flat , not something I would choose to do.
    I assume that they retired to the coast to something smaller.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    They're moving out of London because of the war, aren't they? Presumably the house was rented and a retired travel agent wouldn't have had a particularly generous pension. It must have been quite a large house - there were three adults as well as the children so probably four bedrooms.

  4. #24
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    The shot of the chest with 'Singapore' on it, set things up nicely.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dandy Forsdyke
    Is this the film where one woman says to another, something like, "So help me, one more word from you and I'll slap you so hard I'll make your teeth rattle!"



    If not, it should be.


    It is, indeed, the film where the sister says to the grandmother that she'll slap her so hard that her teeth will rattle. I also like it when, after granny has died, Robert Newton says that "She neither passed on, passed over or passed out: she DIED!"



    It is an extremely clever portrait of how life used to be. We may feel agitated by it now, with all of our freedoms and rights, but it shows very clearly the way people lived and, indeed, the differences between then and now. I am not altogether convinced that the way we live now is actually better.

  6. #26
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    This is my almost all time favourite British film and is a wonderful piece of propaganda at the same time .It seems to encompass everything British while showing an ordinary family of the times dealing with the things familes deal with -death ,accidents ,crochety old relations ,romance,the efects of politics on everday life,and more.



    Robert Newton as the father has some of the best speeches in the film and Celia Johnson is wonderful as the mother .

  7. #27
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Robert Newton's performance was the greatest that I have ever seen.Brilliant

  8. #28
    Senior Member Country: Scotland
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    I agree This Happy Breed is a truly great film, but I wonder if Noel Coward was gulity of patronising the working classes. As far as I believe director David Lean had to tone down some of Coward's play.



    I'll tell you what I mean. During The General Strike Newton's Frank Gibbons was along with Stanley Holloway's Bob Mitchell volunteer workers. They were regarded almost as heros for doing so, while Frank's son Reg and friend Sam Leadbetter were thought of as juvenile for supporting the strike. In reality many of the volunteers were regarded by the working classes as traitors, for not supporting the strike.



    The other thing was the Gibbon's had a housekeeper. I don't think to many working class familes after WW1 could afford to employ one, particulary as three of the five women, Ethel, Sylvia and Frank's aging mother, were living in the house and didn't go out to work



    That said it was a great film. The highlight for me was when Celia Johnson's Ethel welcomed back Kay Walsh's Queenie, three yrs after she disowned her daughter for running off with a married man.

  9. #29
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    A truly wonderful film. I never tire of watching it. The entire cast is completely believable and the acting is 100%. It's a really interesting piece of British history, as well as a good watch. I love the fatherly advice, Robert Newton gives to his son, on his wedding day. I also particularly love the female characters and their eccentricities.



    So glad it's on DVD!

  10. #30
    Senior Member Country: England earlb's Avatar
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    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the dreadful upper class accents trying to be 'man in the street'.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark O
    I may have missed something along the line, but in the Movie is the location of the Family's house ever mentioned?



    Clapham and Leyton come to mind, but I recall Kay Walsh's character in a scene when she says she's fed up with her lot, such as traveling by Tube to Work, but the Tube didn't go to Leyton before World War II


    I have asked the question as to where this movie was filmed previously in this forum. Knowing North London pretty well, I have never seen any similarity between the N.London I know and the locations used. This has put the thought into my mind that South London was used instead. There are also lines spoken by the cast that support this view although I cannot remember any ow, I am afraid. Irrespecive of it's locations, it will always remain one of the British film industrie's finest films.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve lyden brown
    I have asked the question as to where this movie was filmed previously in this forum. Knowing North London pretty well, I have never seen any similarity between the N.London I know and the locations used. This has put the thought into my mind that South London was used instead. There are also lines spoken by the cast that support this view although I cannot remember any ow, I am afraid. Irrespecive of it's locations, it will always remain one of the British film industrie's finest films.
    It was filmed in Alderbrook rd South Clapham

  13. #33
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    I was brought with the idea from my father that ... "there was this strike in the 1920s, but fortunately the students from Oxford came out and drove the trains."



    During my basic training in the RAF, I was talking like this to the chap in the next bed. He said, "What do you mean? They were only asking for a fair wage!"



    I had never thought about it like that before. It was a salutary lesson ... and real eye-opener. National Service was good in that you met people from different backgrounds. Also, as a southerner, I met people from other parts of the UK for the first time.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harleybloke
    The shot of the chest with 'Singapore' on it, set things up nicely.
    Yes, we know that Singapore will fall; daughter and son-in-law may well become prisoners of the Japanese; Coward does this in one of his plays ... could it be Private Lives? Two characters are on a liner looking over the rail and ready to sail for New York. They move away to reveal the name of the ship on a life-belt ... 'Titanic'. The same trick was used in the TV series Upstairs Downstairs. At the end of one series of episodes, Lady Margery is about to leave for Southampton. The final shot is of her suitcase bearing the label 'Titanic'.

  15. #35
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oneless
    Yes, we know that Singapore will fall; daughter and son-in-law may well become prisoners of the Japanese; Coward does this in one of his plays ... could it be Private Lives? Two characters are on a liner looking over the rail and ready to sail for New York. They move away to reveal the name of the ship on a life-belt ... 'Titanic'. The same trick was used in the TV series Upstairs Downstairs. At the end of one series of episodes, Lady Margery is about to leave for Southampton. The final shot is of her suitcase bearing the label 'Titanic'.
    Cavalcade. And in Upstairs Downstairs it's actually Mr Bellamy reading out a telegram that lets us know what ship Lady Marjorie is on (the cast apparently all though this was a completely ridiculous cliche - and they have a point - but it works very well, I think, especially for those pre-internet days when Rachel Gurney leaving the series wouldn't have been known to the viewers in advance).

  16. #36
    Senior Member Country: Europe Bernardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainWaggett
    Cavalcade. And in Upstairs Downstairs it's actually Mr Bellamy reading out a telegram that lets us know what ship Lady Marjorie is on (the cast apparently all though this was a completely ridiculous cliche - and they have a point - but it works very well, I think, especially for those pre-internet days when Rachel Gurney leaving the series wouldn't have been known to the viewers in advance).
    Still do it in Australian soaps:-

    'Mind that big boat Noreen you never know, there are a lot of icebergs at the moment your ship might hit one and sink and you can not swim.'(Threatening music cut to end titles with Noreen looking worried).

  17. #37
    Senior Member Country: Europe Bernardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark O
    I love this Film too!........being in Colour makes all the difference, love the bickering scenes and banter between the characters played by Amy Veness and Alison Leggat
    Yes the two live-in female relatives (not uncommon in those days) The interplay suggests that Noel had experienced the same problem that I have today as he portrays it exactly as it is.

  18. #38
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    I'm struck by the way NC wrote lines which end in tags. For example:-



    - and no mistake

    - and no error

    - I�m sure

    - I shouldn�t wonder

    - if I may make so bold



    I've noticed these tags in 'Happy Breed'; also in 'In which we Serve'. Were they really as common - even in the 1940s? That is the era of my childhood - yet even to me they do sound strange.



    Other little points which I've noticed and like are:-



    * The way people used to iron clothes with the iron connected to an overhead light fitting. When did you last see someone doing that?

    * The small metal jug (like a miniature milk churn) that was used to fetch milk

    * The way Ethel cleans Frank's boots - (was it common for wives to do that?)

    * Strange in these days of round-the-clock radio - but did you notice how Frank says, "Well, that's it. All the stations have closed down now."

    * The scene where the youngsters are sitting together on Christmas day and when Sam makes a speech. This is reminiscent of the scene in 'In which we Serve', where there is an argument about the Marines and the Navy.

    * Merle Tottenham (Edie, the maid) is just lovely



    O

  19. #39
    Senior Member Country: Europe Bernardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oneless
    I'm struck by the way NC wrote lines which end in tags. For example:-



    - and no mistake

    - and no error

    - I’m sure

    - I shouldn’t wonder

    - if I may make so bold



    I've noticed these tags in 'Happy Breed'; also in 'In which we Serve'. Were they really as common - even in the 1940s? That is the era of my childhood - yet even to me they do sound strange.



    Other little points which I've noticed and like are:-



    * The way people used to iron clothes with the iron connected to an overhead light fitting. When did you last see someone doing that?

    * The small metal jug (like a miniature milk churn) that was used to fetch milk

    * The way Ethel cleans Frank's boots - (was it common for wives to do that?)

    * Strange in these days of round-the-clock radio - but did you notice how Frank says, "Well, that's it. All the stations have closed down now."

    * The scene where the youngsters are sitting together on Christmas day and when Sam makes a speech. This is reminiscent of the scene in 'In which we Serve', where there is an argument about the Marines and the Navy.

    * Merle Tottenham (Edie, the maid) is just lovely



    O
    Hello Oneless, I think I recognise a fellow who looks at films with the same eye as I do.

    The ironing, yes shock horror, you could buy adaptors to plug into the light for appliances!! I think sale of such items may be illegal now but there were not all the floor points in those days especially in the scullery.

    I use to take the jug for some milk I think a man came round on a horse and cart when I visited my Nan and a recharge for the 'accumulator' another odd thing to do.

    Wives or children cleaned dad's boots and thought nothing of it.

    A chair by the radio and charge of tuning the stations was the man of the house job. Especially football pool results...utter silence demanded and 9 o'clock evening news during the war. Everyone went to work and slept at night so why have radio at night? Also don't forget the shortages of energy and it's conservation. Pity we could not go back to wartime austerity a bit we would be thinner, healthier and energy aware.

    Yes and the similarities you pointed out, I could not relate to as everyday speech either. Have you checked the credits of the two films?

  20. #40
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    Yes, yes ...



    Quote Originally Posted by Bernardo
    The ironing, yes shock horror, you could buy adaptors to plug into the light for appliances!! I think sale of such items may be illegal now but there were not all the floor points in those days especially in the scullery.
    If I remember rightly, the iron plugged into an adaptor which was off-set at 45 degrees but the light bulb would hang straight down. And wasn't there something else about a different charge for electricity from 'light' and from 'power sockets'? The former charge per unit was lower, I think.



    O

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