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  1. #1
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    Anybody know the location of the exterior shots of the house used in the film.Most of the film was shot in studio,but where was the street scene?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    Somewhere in South Clapham, London.

  3. #3
    Junior Member Country: UK
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    Alderbrook Road SW12

  4. #4
    Senior Member Country: Vietnam hankoler's Avatar
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    Can anyone tell me where in London was this film shot. ( the house and the street).

  5. #5
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    Alderbrook Road, Clapham, according to IMDB. It sounds plausible - Coward grew up on the SouthSide of the common which is only about 5 minutes walk away (though it's surprising that the film doesn't mention the Common as far as I remember since I'm sure it would have played a major part in the family's life. Presumably Coward just wasn't the playing cricket in the park type)

  6. #6
    Senior Member Country: Australia
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    Funny sort of a film. I could never see what Johnny Mills saw in that strumpet of a daughter.

  7. #7
    Junior Member Country: UK
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    It is 53 Alderbrook Road, SW12.

    It hasn't changed much, just a lot more cars parked in the street.

    The school seen at the end of the road when the wedding car is driving off is still there.

    The house was sold 5 years ago for just under �600k. At the time of the sale there were a number of internal pictures of the house on the estate agent's website. They bore a high level of similarity to the studio sets used for the interior shots. Reg's bedroom for example was practically identical!

    I don't suppose the current owner is aware (or interested) in its history!

  8. #8
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    Alderbrook Road, Clapham, according to IMDB. It sounds plausible - Coward grew up on the SouthSide of the common which is only about 5 minutes walk away (though it's surprising that the film doesn't mention the Common as far as I remember since I'm sure it would have played a major part in the family's life. Presumably Coward just wasn't the playing cricket in the park type)
    I can only recall one scene of RN & CJ sitting in a park..................

  9. #9
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    I can only recall one scene of RN & CJ sitting in a park..................
    Isn't that Hyde Park? They go to Speaker's Corner and make a point of saying they never get time to sit in a park (despite living about 400 yards from one...)

  10. #10
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    Isn't that Hyde Park? They go to Speaker's Corner and make a point of saying they never get time to sit in a park (despite living about 400 yards from one...)
    Tis indeed Capt!! Well remembered!!

  11. #11
    Member Country: UK
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    The wireless features three times in this film.



    * Frank is seen on Christmas Day fiddling with a crystal set � much to the annoyance of Ethel, who has given it to him as a present.



    * Ethel had been given a modern valve receiver by Reg; this set is playing dance music when Vi brings the news of the car crash in which Reg and Phyllis have been killed.



    * Finally, at the time of the death of King George V, the solemn voice of a BBC announcer is heard saying, �The King�s life is moving peacefully to its close.�



    But have you noticed the fancy wireless aerial?



    On the wedding day (Reg and Vi), we see a wooden mast fixed to the side of the house outside Reg�s bedroom. However, the aerial attached to this mast is, in fact, a transmitting aerial known as a �flat top�, which has parallel wires separated at each end by wide wooden spacers.



    Later in the film (after the scene where Frank and Ethel receive the news of the car crash), it is spring; now a tall mast is visible at the end of the garden. The flat top aerial is running across the garden to the wooden pole affixed to the rear of the house. (This is in the scene where Edie, the maid, is complaining that the plughole is bunged up.)



    The flat top aerial gets pride of place at dusk (in the scene after they have heard the Fascist haranguing the crowd at Speakers� Corner). The camera pans and there now appear to be two flat top aerials � one going to the Gibbons�s house and the other to house next door.



    Now go back to the scene in Reg�s bedroom after the General Strike. (Reg has a bandage around his head after having been injured by a demonstrator.) Stretching across the bedroom is what looks like a miniature rope ladder. This is what is known as a �balanced feeder� and would connect such a flat top aerial to a transmitter. These balanced feeders were especially popular with radio amateurs (�hams�) from the 1930s to the 1950s.



    There is nothing to suggest that Reg was a radio ham. So was the location at Alderbrook Road SW12 the home of one? If so, he would not have been allowed to transmit when the film was made in 1944. But could he have been one of the Volunteer interceptors (VIs) whose secret work involved listening on short wave to enemy Morse transmissions?



    All this is most unlikely. In my opinion, the director simply wanted an impressive looking aerial for the shots, and was loaned a flat top aerial complete with its balanced feeders by a radio amateur. The owner would not have wanted to disconnect the balanced feeders, which are fiddly to assemble, and so they were simply strung across Reg�s bedroom for that shot.



    O

  12. #12
    Senior Member Country: Europe Bernardo's Avatar
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    I have not your technical backround but I can assure you that, even in London Edmonton, aerials ran the lenth of the back garden, strung out like washing lines. People like to listen to foreign stations as BBC was pretty dire hence the attempts to maximise reception. During the war transmitting would be dangerous to say the least.

  13. #13
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    I have not your technical backround but I can assure you that, even in London Edmonton, aerials ran the lenth of the back garden, strung out like washing lines. People like to listen to foreign stations as BBC was pretty dire hence the attempts to maximise reception. During the war transmitting would be dangerous to say the least.
    Well Peter & Helen Kroger in Ruislip had a big aerial - to communicate with their Soviet paymasters. Maybe there was another spy ring in Edmonton?



    Steve

  14. #14
    Member Country: UK
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    Ok about the aerial.



    I agree that most homes had an aerial which would run the length of the garden. However, this was a single stretch of wire which was plugged directly to the set and held in place with a matchstick or a small red or black 'wander plug'. Such an aerial would bring in foreign stations like Radio Normandie or Radio Luxembourg ... the latter for the Ovaltiny programme. And after WW2, we all listened to AFN Frankfurt in the evenings ... there was a programme called 'Night Train' which came on at 10 pm. The signature tune was Sunny Side of the Street ... and if I close my eyes I can hear it now ... and see the yellow dial light from the Philco receiver by my bed.



    However, in the film, the aerial is more sophisticated and appears to have had the 'rope ladder' type of balanced feeders. But there is nothing more to this than the fact that the director wanted an interesting looking aerial for the shots. The traditional length of single wire would not have made much of an impact.



    O

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