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  1. #41
    Senior Member Country: UK isbright's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman
    The BBC broadcast a documentary a while ago called 'Fame, Fashion and Photography:The Real Blow Up' which featured a long section about the film and included interviews with most of the people involved.
    Whilst on the subject does anyone know where I can get hold of a copy of this programme, or, better still, does anyone have a copy of it? I keep missing it on TV and would really like to see it.

  2. #42
    Senior Member Country: Europe
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    Quote Originally Posted by isbright
    Hi all,



    Was recently on my latest photoshoot of Blowup locations and the owner of 'El Blason' - the restaurant that David Hemmings' character meets Ron (Peter Bowles) at - told me that Joanna Lumley had been in recently with a film crew to make a documentary. Now I may have lost in translation what the owner was saying (he's Spanish) but I'm sure it was to do with the film and not just a restaurant review!



    Could anyone put me straight as to how I might find out more? For instance, does anyone have contact details for Joanna's agent perhaps? Or has anyone heard whisperings about this elsewhere?



    I'm particularly interested as I've got loads of 'now' photos of the locations with stills of the film to compare them to, and I'm just mad about the film.
    Try:

    Joanna Lumley - David Higham Associates

  3. #43
    Senior Member Country: UK isbright's Avatar
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    Thnaks for that Fellwanderer - awaiting a response to my e-mail to them.

  4. #44
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    Cool Hand Luke , the wee vixen washing the car when all the convicts were staring at her.

  5. #45
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    some scenes are cringy, some done tasteful in films what about Women in Love

  6. #46
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    There was a film released in 1968-69 called CANDY I think with Ringo Star - more explicit than Blow Up I thought.

  7. #47
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    There was a film released in 1968-69 called CANDY I think with Ringo Star - more explicit than Blow Up I thought.
    Candy had such a great cast .... Brando, Burton et al ..... it is quite explicit for a mainstream fim of the time but my goodness is it crap!

  8. #48
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    Surely there's only one possible candidate for the title of bluest film?

  9. #49
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    Candy had such a great cast .... Brando, Burton et al ..... it is quite explicit for a mainstream fim of the time but my goodness is it crap!
    Only goes to prove the old adage - **** will fill the cinema! It was packed when I saw the film

  10. #50
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    think Brando in Last Tango , not what you d hand out really to supposedly one of the greats, he wasnt for me at all, Ill stick with old Spencer Tracy bet he wouldnt have used butter.

  11. #51
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    think Brando in Last Tango , not what you d hand out really to supposedly one of the greats, he wasnt for me at all, Ill stick with old Spencer Tracy bet he wouldnt have used butter.
    Apart from the bathroom scene I found the whole film very boring

  12. #52
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    never seen the film just a clip, that was enough for me John

  13. #53
    Senior Member Country: Aaland dremble wedge's Avatar
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    Candy had such a great cast .... Brando, Burton et al ..... it is quite explicit for a mainstream fim of the time but my goodness is it crap!
    Loved Burton in it and Brando made me snigger, but as for the rest...

  14. #54
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    Loved Burton in it and Brando made me snigger, but as for the rest...
    What about Ulla Ulyn (probably the wrong spelling again)

  15. #55
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    What about Ulla Ulyn (probably the wrong spelling again)
    Ewa Aulin - cute chick, couldn't act.

  16. #56
    Senior Member Country: Aaland dremble wedge's Avatar
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    What about Ulla Ulyn (probably the wrong spelling again)
    Can't imagine who you mean...




  17. #57
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    Can't imagine who you mean...



    The only item of clothing she had in the film

    Re my other thread, it would be nice to learn what she is up to now

  18. #58
    Senior Member Country: Scotland julian_craster's Avatar
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    The poster for Blow Up explodes with urgency

    London in the 1960s was a place of enormous change and cosmopolitanism. The poster for Blow Up encapsulates the age brilliantly



    by Paul Rennie

    guardian.co.uk,

    Monday September 22 2008

    The poster for Blow Up explodes with urgency | Film | guardian.co.uk







    At roughly the same time England's football team were winning the World Cup, Michelangelo Antonioni's film Blow Up was deconstructing the world of appearances.



    The question of what we understand as real and substantial was at the heart of the 1960s avant garde. The New Wave film-makers from Europe began to mix things up in an effort to draw attention to the intrinsic artifice of cinema. Beginnings, middles and ends were jumbled, song and dance routines inserted, and the paraphernalia and mechanics of film-making revealed. All this brought into question the naturalness and reality of the film world.



    Beyond the rarefied world of the avant garde, Antonioni's film was a serious part of a process that effectively dismantled the comfy and long-standing agreements about money, power and prestige in Britain. The swinging 60s provided a framework for the redistribution of power and prestige, especially in the cultural arena. It's not surprising that, in consequence, social conservatives have consistently tried to revise the 1960s downwards.



    The 1960s was a period of enormous and irrevocable social change in Britain. The end of national service and the expansion of the university sector changed the experience of higher education across Britain. The student body became younger, more gender equal and, thanks to the new social sciences, more critical of the establishment's instruments of power.



    The convergence of these trends created a radical and popular politics based around a youth culture of hedonistic lifestyle choices. These choices expressed themselves through fashion, music, sexual liberation and recreational drug use and effectively called into question the moral superiority of the ruling class. The various political scandals, and loss of face, attaching themselves to the elite during the 1960s simply confirmed the widespread feeling, amongst the young, that a new kind of democratic reality was urgently required.

    Love the camera, baby



    The photographer emerged, in the course of the 1960s, as a major force in shaping the new reality and giving it visual expression. At the beginnings of the 1960s, photography for publication was still a mostly studio-based affair with statuesque models and static poses. The models were chosen from the ranks of aristocratic debutantes and gave expression to a top-down fashion system in which beauty, style and elegance were all derived from history, breeding and tradition.



    Of course this was fine for when the fashion system was based on couture and where the only market for clothes was made-to-measure. The emergence of ready-to-wear collections, exemplified by Saint Laurent's Rive Gauche in 1966, challenged the orthodoxy of the fashion system. Suddenly, fashion was about something younger and more dynamic.



    Accordingly, a new kind of photographic imagery was required. The studio was abandoned in favour of location shoots and hand-held medium format or 35mm. The Leica camera, the first of the high quality hand-held compacts had revolutionised photography. New points of view were made possible. The exaggerated diagonals of vertical perspectives distinguished these early efforts at dynamic photography during the 1920s and 30s.



    By the 1960s, the compact cameras and fast films had allowed the shoot to become a more proactive process. This involved the photographer maintaining a constant flow of encouraging talk while shooting hundreds of images. The dynamic voyeurism of the process gave the new images a sex appeal rooted in the real-life emancipation of economic and social equality.



    David Bailey, Terence Donovan and Duffy emerged as the new names of fashion photography. The street, and its models, became the backdrop against which new trends, and new faces (Twiggy and Jean Shrimpton especially), were positioned. A little later, George Best became a conduit for a lifestyle of fashion, cars and footie.

    Image



    The poster for Blow Up is a rough mechanically-produced piece of photolithography. It is designed to look like a screen print. The image of the model and photographer, mid-shoot, is enlarged to the limits of half-tone photomechanical reproduction. The image, reduced to a series of dots, has begun to lose definition. However, these technical limitations are used to advantage so as to communicate a sense of urgent and dynamic reality to both the protagonists and to the film event. The visible half-tone effect also positions the image amongst those associated with documentary and press photographs. So, the poster image immediately appeals to the heightened realism associated with these genres.



    The titles and credits are presented in a typographic style associated with the workaday functionalism of 1960s modernism. The typeface is a condensed sans serif of the kind normally associated with newspaper advertising, headline texts and information graphics. The text eschews all decoration in favour of emotional neutrality that, again, positions the film within the domain of non-fiction.



    This is in sharp contrast with the typographic exuberance of many film, theatre and entertainment announcements. The early history of letterpress playbills for the theatre made a virtue of the limited typographic resources available to printers. The relative shortage of letters in big sizes forced them to adopt a typographic eclecticism in their arrangements of titles and information. Again, the poster design for Blow Up signals a sharp break from the traditions of the past.



    Three versions of the poster exist, each with different coloured backgrounds. The solid red, yellow and green provide for variation when the poster is displayed, in series, on the hoardings of building sites and street corners. By using a visual rhetoric of functionalism and a graphic style derived from the exigencies of counter-cultural fly posting, the poster brings together the film space and street scene of cosmopolitan London. This poster swings.




  19. #59
    Super Moderator Country: UK christoph404's Avatar
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    David Bailey has said in interviews when asked about "Blow Up" that Antonioni approached him in the early stages to star in the film as the photographer and that he agreed to meet with Antonioni and some "mafia figures" out of politeness. Bailey thought the idea absurd and rejected it off hand, as he quite rightly pointed out to Antonioni, he wasn't an actor. I would say the character is based 98% on Bailey regardless of what Hemmings or anyone else says! The 2% is Terence Donovan who drove a convertible Rolls just like the Hemmings character and was still driving it well into the 80s and 90s up until his death. Bailey was fairly unique and is quite accurately portrayed in the film! (IMHO)

  20. #60
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    Click here:

    Strangled Spiked



    Nothing new here, except a link between Blow Up and another British rock band...




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