Page 11 of 23 FirstFirst ... 91011121321 ... LastLast
Results 201 to 220 of 458
  1. #201
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    name='MB']Wow

    Actually I have no idea if that is correct or not - but it sounds right.





    (I hope I'm doing this right) " Call me Ishmael" began the Techno DJ's appendage (and great nephew of the author.)

    (clue: it is a bit rude and not a quote - but cryptic. )
    That's the great white way-l



    Here's a side puzzle for you, what does the word "Moby" mean? Why did Melville use it? Can you find any reference to it before Melville used it (in 1851)



    Steve

  2. #202
    Senior Member Country: Wales
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,337
    Liked
    0 times




    moby





    1. adj. Large, immense, complex, impressive. "A Saturn V rocket is a truly moby frob.



    Well, Mr Crook, I do declare!



    Oh my word, fancy being named after that.

  3. #203
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    27,595
    Liked
    255 times
    name='Steve Crook']



    Here's a side puzzle for you, what does the word "Moby" mean? Why did Melville use it? Can you find any reference to it before Melville used it (in 1851)



    Steve


    The only explanation/definition I have ever heard for 'moby' (apart from post Melville usage) is that he took it from a native word meaning 'double' or 'larger' which he picked up from his time living on the Marquesas Islands.

  4. #204
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,213
    Liked
    2 times
    name='batman']The only explanation/definition I have ever heard for 'moby' (apart from post Melville usage) is that he took it from a native word meaning 'double' or 'larger' which he picked up from his time living on the Marquesas Islands.


    So, in the Melvillian context, what is a Dick?

  5. #205
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    27,595
    Liked
    255 times
    name='thatllbetheday']So, in the Melvillian context, what is a Dick?


    As someone once said .... "I couldn't possibly comment".

  6. #206
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    name='batman']The only explanation/definition I have ever heard for 'moby' (apart from post Melville usage) is that he took it from a native word meaning 'double' or 'larger' which he picked up from his time living on the Marquesas Islands.
    If anyone has a reference for that I'd be interested to see it. All the dictionaries only refer it back to Melville's usage in 1851.



    But I don't think he just made it up



    Steve

  7. #207
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    27,595
    Liked
    255 times
    There are some interesting conjectures in this link ....



    LINK: The Origin of "Moby Dick"

  8. #208
    Senior Member Country: Wales
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,337
    Liked
    0 times
    I am reading this to my daughter at the moment. Anyone guess?



    Here lived Peter, the eleven-year-old boy, who every morning went down to Dorfli to fetch his goats and drive them up on to the mountain, where they were free to browse till evening on the delicious mountain plants.



    Then Peter, with his light-footed animals, would go running and leaping down the mountain again till he reached Dorfli, and there he would give a shrill whistle through his fingers, whereupon all the owners of the goats would come out to fetch home the animals that belonged to them.

  9. #209
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,213
    Liked
    2 times
    Heidi

  10. #210
    Senior Member Country: Wales
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,337
    Liked
    0 times

  11. #211
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,213
    Liked
    2 times
    That was pretty easy. Even though I've never actually read it.

  12. #212
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,213
    Liked
    2 times
    ETYMOLOGY.



    (Supplied by a Late Consumptive Usher to a Grammar School)



    The pale Usher--threadbare in coat, heart, body, and brain; I see him

    now. He was ever dusting his old lexicons and grammars, with a queer

    handkerchief, mockingly embellished with all the gay flags of all the

    known nations of the world. He loved to dust his old grammars; it

    somehow mildly reminded him of his mortality
    .



    The opening of a very famous book.

  13. #213
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    name='batman']There are some interesting conjectures in this link ....



    LINK: The Origin of "Moby Dick"
    Yes, that's the origin that my local librarian and I found when I asked her one day. There were references to Mocha Dick off the Mocha coast (Yemen), Timor Tom, New Zealand Jack and other named whales that had avoided the whalers. And Melville had sailed with the whalers out of Nantucket so it's quite possible he heard these stories.



    Nobody knows why he turned Mocha into Moby but it seems the most plausible explanation.



    Steve

  14. #214
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    name='thatllbetheday']The opening of a very famous book.
    The real opening, not the start of chapter 1 which was mentioned just recently



    Steve

  15. #215
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    27,595
    Liked
    255 times
    name='Steve Crook']



    Nobody knows why he turned Mocha into Moby but it seems the most plausible explanation.



    Steve


    The 'native language' theory I remember reading in a magazine article ages ago. I had not heard of Mocha (apart from the coffee) until I read that link. I tend to head towards the Mocha/Toby theory after reading that.

  16. #216
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,213
    Liked
    2 times
    name='Steve Crook']The real opening, not the start of chapter 1 which was mentioned just recently



    Steve


    Certainly the book in question has been discussed very recently. So it is ........

  17. #217
    Senior Member Country: Wales
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,337
    Liked
    0 times
    It is the prologue to 'Moby Dick'.

  18. #218
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Not a cryptic one, who can recognise the text from this famous book?



    Shortly after this the cruel Queen died and a post-mortem examination revealed the word 'CALLOUS' engraved on her heart.



    Steve

  19. #219
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    6,659
    Liked
    144 times
    name='thatllbetheday']ETYMOLOGY.



    (Supplied by a Late Consumptive Usher to a Grammar School)



    The pale Usher--threadbare in coat, heart, body, and brain; I see him

    now. He was ever dusting his old lexicons and grammars, with a queer

    handkerchief, mockingly embellished with all the gay flags of all the

    known nations of the world. He loved to dust his old grammars; it

    somehow mildly reminded him of his mortality
    .



    The opening of a very famous book.


    Etymology (suite)



    WHALE (baleine)....Du Su�dois et du Danois "hval". On a nomm� cet animal d'apr�s sa rondeur et ses roulements; car en Danois "hvalt" signifie arqu� ou vo�t�.

    [Dictionnaire de Webster]

  20. #220
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    6,659
    Liked
    144 times
    name='Steve Crook']Not a cryptic one, who can recognise the text from this famous book?



    Shortly after this the cruel Queen died and a post-mortem examination revealed the word 'CALLOUS' engraved on her heart.



    Steve


    Snowhite (in the white snow ?) by Swiss writer Robert Walser

Page 11 of 23 FirstFirst ... 91011121321 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. What do you think of literature adaptations?
    By fiando in forum Media Studies
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 28-01-12, 08:48 PM
  2. A conversation about the dumbing down of literature
    By ZogmoreTheAncient in forum Off-Topic Discussion
    Replies: 160
    Last Post: 15-01-11, 05:13 AM
  3. Just Good Friends
    By winsfordtown in forum British Television
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-12-09, 04:24 PM
  4. Disabled people in films, literature and TV: Times article
    By Maurice in forum General Film Chat
    Replies: 76
    Last Post: 02-11-09, 11:24 PM
  5. Friends in the business
    By PhiltheFluter in forum Actors and Actresses
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 11-02-09, 03:52 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts