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  1. #1
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    No film in particular,no matter what side of the Atlantic divide,but I am often curious why in some films you get a far shot of two actors with a real outdoor scenic background,and then when there is a close up of them,it is done in the studio.

    Just curious,that's all.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

  2. #2
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    name='Marky B']No film in particular,no matter what side of the Atlantic divide,but I am often curious why in some films you get a far shot of two actors with a real outdoor scenic background,and then when there is a close up of them,it is done in the studio.

    Just curious,that's all.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B


    It's just a technique that's in the standard vocabulary of film. The distance shot is called "the establishing shot" and it lets you see where the people are. Then you have a "Two shot" with them both in shot (often in profile facing each other) for the dialogue between them. Or you might have a "shot reverse shot" where you only see one person at a time and the camera (or the editing) switches back and forth between them, showing the person speaking.



    Of course none of this is essential in a film. But it's the way it's often done. And it's done so often that way that some people are actually shocked when a film does it any other way



    The best ones are when you don't realise that they've come into the studios for the dialogue. In fact the best editing is when you don't notice that it's been edited



    Steve

  3. #3
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    name='Steve Crook']It's just a technique that's in the standard vocabulary of film. The distance shot is called "the establishing shot" and it lets you see where the people are. Then you have a "Two shot" with them both in shot (often in profile facing each other) for the dialogue between them. Or you might have a "shot reverse shot" where you only see one person at a time and the camera (or the editing) switches back and forth between them, showing the person speaking.



    Of course none of this is essential in a film. But it's the way it's often done. And it's done so often that way that some people are actually shocked when a film does it any other way



    The best ones are when you don't realise that they've come into the studios for the dialogue. In fact the best editing is when you don't notice that it's been edited



    Steve


    Thanks,Steve.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

  4. #4
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
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    I recall in that RKO retrospective that was on TV recently, they had an experienced film-maker explaining how he had explained this sort of thing to Orson Welles when Welles was setting about making Citizen Kane. Welles had no notion of the *vocabulary of film* and as this guy described what he had explained to Welles, the documentary-makers flashed his *typical establishing drawing* and then showed a frame from Kane, to show how Welles followed the instructions he had been given......



    I guess somebody showed Hendrix how to play chords once..........

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Country: Great Britain
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    Is it more likely to be the difficulty of getting location voice recordings? Its much easier to control (and probably cheaper) to record the speech in a studio, surely? And how many times are the "actors" in the distance the real players and not stand-ins? Its normally an establishing shot possibly done by a second unit, leaving the director to get on with other shooting. A good example for Steve is I Know Where I'm Going where Roger Livesey never went to Mull for his scenes. Or the windmill scene in Went the Day Well? where Basil Sydney and Leslie Banks had to re-record their dialogue due to the noise of the breeze.



    Nick

  6. #6
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    name='Nick Dando']Is it more likely to be the difficulty of getting location voice recordings? Its much easier to control (and probably cheaper) to record the speech in a studio, surely? And how many times are the "actors" in the distance the real players and not stand-ins? Its normally an establishing shot possibly done by a second unit, leaving the director to get on with other shooting. A good example for Steve is I Know Where I'm Going where Roger Livesey never went to Mull for his scenes. Or the windmill scene in Went the Day Well? where Basil Sydney and Leslie Banks had to re-record their dialogue due to the noise of the breeze.



    Nick
    They often have to dub the audio for all long shots. It depends how far away they are and if they're recognisable when they decide if they should use the stars or doubles. Even things like Bob & Alison on the cart in A Canterbury Tale had to be dubbed (post-sync) in the studio afterwards.



    It often is cheaper to film it all in the studio. But it often shows

    Compare A Canterbury Tale with its wonderful location work and the studio-bound Great Day which otherwise has a lot of similarities to ACT



    Steve

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