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Thread: Barry Lyndon

  1. #21
    Super Moderator Country: Great Britain
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    Kubrick liked him, I imagine, as he also appeared in 2001.



    Nick

  2. #22
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    I think it's underrated imo, but then again the narration does drains away any drama the film might have because we are told what is coming in advance, which might account for this in the minds of many.



    I'm a great fan of the narration btw - and Michael Horden is impeccable.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by cally
    . . . the narration does drains away any drama the film might have because we are told what is coming in advance . . .
    It was the amusing and delectable custom of novelists of the period to apply to each chapter a little preview, an announcement of what will happen next. I do not have Thackeray's Barry Lyndon to hand, but in Tom Jones (which, dear reader, I do have), Chapter 4, Book Nine, for instance, and which is where the book happened to fall open on this most auspicious occasion, being as it is for the benefit of Britmovie readers, Henry Fielding writes - "In Which the Arrival of a Man of War puts a Final end to Hostilities, and causes the Conclusion of a firm and lasting Peace between all parties."

    There are several layers of perspective in Barry Lyndon - an 18th century story, written in the 19th, filmed in the 20th - and Kubrick's stylistic overlay, including this narrative device, enhances the period authenticity as well as reinforcing the idea of Barry Lyndon as a heavily symbolic moral argument in which the people involved are less characters than archetypes. Thus it does not matter dramatically that we know what might happen next, because higher things are involved.



    Geddit?

  4. #24
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    Hey Adrian I knew that alreadies - I just remember the reviews at the time suggested that the voice-over drained the film of dramatic impact.



    I know it was a literary device - unfortunately most of the critics failed to realise this.



    Either way it's a masterpiece imo as I thought I'd made clear.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by penfold
    It's one of the most sumptuously shot films ever...every shot is gorgeous; but for me the problem is the casting of Ryan O'Neal. Hopelessly out of his depth, I'm afraid, and the film as a whole fails as a result.
    I entirely agree. Given that Kubrick was so fanatical about every detail of his movies being correct, one wonders as to his choice of O'Neal for the lead role ?

  6. #26
    Senior Member Country: England faginsgirl's Avatar
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    Barry Lyndon is said to be based on the real life Andrew `stoney` Bowes who married Mary Elenor Bowes, an ancestor of the Queen mum. I know because I have researched into `stoney` for work. Mary Elenor ran away from him from the north east to London where he kidnapped her back. It is said he locked her in a cuboard and gave her nothing but bread and water.



    There is a rumour that that is where the saying `stoney broke` comes from as he died in a debters prison, but this has never been proven.



    If anyone needs any further info just let me know.



    xx

  7. #27
    Senior Member Country: Wales David Challinor's Avatar
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    I love this film too...I went to the NFT way back in 1987 just to see it on a big screen. It was worth it.

    The soundtrack's good too.

    I find 2001 grossly overrated, and Eyes Wide Shut a wash-out, but the rest of his films were brilliant - well the Shining is tedious one-viewing, the next fascinating.

    Paths of Glory is probably his most powerful.

  8. #28
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    Still yet to see "Eyes' as I'm waiting to see it on big screen (missed the opening - never mind why) although the only person I've ever heard say they liked it was Jim Jarmusch.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    Barry Lyndon



    Re-released this week as part of a Stanley Kubrick season at the BFI Southbank is his dazzling adaptation of Thackeray�s novel Barry Lyndon. Ryan O�Neal plays the eponymous Irish cad who seduces, battles and brawls his up way through European society. He�s a gambler and a ruthless manipulator of the fairer sex � he�s not, it has to be said, the most sympathetic of characters.



    But the dry humour with which Kubrick approaches the story disarms the audience before they condemn the man. It�s a work of technical brilliance and considerable beauty; the slow and deliberate pacing only serves to make Barry�s adventures more fascinating and the supporting cast � particularly Leonard Rossiter, Murray Melvin, Gay Hamilton and Steven Berkoff � is tremendous.

  10. #30
    Senior Member HUGHJAMPTON's Avatar
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    Probably my favourite of Kubrik's films. Stanley who was deemed as a bit of a cold fish director, actually does something that the book doesn't do, in that he plays with our sympathies for Lyndon. Thackeray has him as an out and out cad, IMHO Lyndon redeems himself a little in the film, with the added duel scene.



    Plus one of the best comic performances from Rossiter.

  11. #31
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    Great film, and a wonderful music soundtrack - I still have the LP.



    rgds

    Rob

  12. #32
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Visually magnificent. Marvelous to look at. The score is beautiful.



    The characters and the plot are secondary to the production. This doesn't quite work. The cool distance, the absence of any point of view on the part of the director besides a mild irony, and the lack of urgency and intensity eventually drain the film.



    But it has to be seen for the sheer beauty of the production.

  13. #33
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    Most definitely one of the best flicks ever made and over time has become my favourite Kubrick.

  14. #34
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    sumptuous gorgeousity !!

  15. #35
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    Was part of Barry Lyndon shot in Bath? I remember at about the time it was made, walking unexpectedly onto a street set in Bath with horse drawn carriages and appropriately dressed extras. But I'm not sure which film they were shooting.

  16. #36
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    This was Kubrick's period film consolation prize after he wasn't able to get "Napoleon" made. Easily one of his best movies. His attention to detail is amazing.

  17. #37
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    When a film is as beautiful to watch and as beautifully made as Barry Lyndon I am willing to overlook many weaknesses.

    I am glad, though, that I saw it in a theatre. We used to have school film trips to Manhattan when I was a boy. We would take the commuter train to one of the large old theatres in midtown and we usually saw epics, which I always liked.

    Barry Lyndon was at the old Ziegfeld - a beautiful old theatre with a balcony. It was ideal for that film. I have not seen it on television since then. Those large scale films lose so much on the small screen.

  18. #38
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    Not as comprehensive as the Born Free one, maybe Barry Lyndon was for more selective audiences than the hoi polloi in Hounslow

  19. #39
    Senior Member HUGHJAMPTON's Avatar
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    Thanks for that Rick. It was local to me: the ABC Bexleyheath. How I missed that, I don't know?



    Cheers

  20. #40
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    Kubrick's casting was supreme - Ryan O'Neal's role as Redmond Barry is of a believable anti-hero, and I'm assuming that's because O'Neal's own persona isn't totally removed from his acting.

    The same with Cruise in Eyes Wide Shut.



    I did enjoy reading Barry Lyndon too, no doubt thanks to Kubrick. Are there any notable Lorna Doone productions?

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