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Thread: Hot Fuzz

  1. #1
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    Edgar Wright Talks Shaun Follow-Up



    The Shaun of the Dead bandwagon may be rumbling on through its tour of America, gathering celebrity fans left, right and centre (George Romero, Sam Raimi, and Quentin Tarantino are all huge fans, and Peter Jackson has called it "the most entertaining film I have seen all year."), but Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg aren't just sitting back and letting all the adulation go to their heads.



    Instead they've started work on their eagerly-awaited follow-up – and it's not a sequel to SOTD. In fact, the boys are tackling another much-loved genre.



    "We want to tackle the action / cop genre. The idea would be to do a sequel in tone to Shaun but to tackle what we think of as the Great British Action Film, in the grand tradition of The Young Americans and Downtime," laughed Edgar, speaking from his hotel in Minneapolis.



    "I've always found it amusing when I was at college and there was a spate of films out that tried to make out that London and Scotland and Manchester were as action-packed as LA or New York," explained Wright (seen here with Pegg and the original 'The Dead Walk' newspaper from Day of the Dead, donated to them by FX guru, Greg Nicotero).



    "But I don't think there's really been a convincing UK action film. I don't count Get Carter or Long Good Friday because they're more crime films. So I'm not slagging off all the great British crime movies. We just thought it would be really fun to make the UK equivalent of Hard Boiled or Desperado - but very, very English!"



    It had been reported recently that action was where Wright and Pegg were next headed, although with the involvement of the likes of Little Britain's Matt Lucas and David Walliams, and – bizarrely – Dustin Hoffman and Alfred Molina mooted for cameo roles. Well, let us shoot down the clay pigeon of rumour with the trusty bullets of fact.



    "It's very early days but some of the story was bullshit," said Wright. "Not that we wouldn't want to work with them. We could find a part definitely for Alfred Molina. He's a great British actor and one of the best villains working at the moment."



    The only cast members so far confirmed include Pegg (naturally) and Nick Frost, whose Ed went down such a storm in Shaun. But though there won't be any cross-over in characters between Shaun and the new movie, Wright did reveal that the two films might not be totally separate. "I love the idea of expanding and having a repertory company in a way. I like the idea on the next one, as well as involving some of the Spaced and Shaun crowd, to cast the net wider and keep bringing people into it," confirmed Wright.



    "We'd like to continue over a couple of scenes or running jokes. There are a couple of synergy things in Spaced and we'd like to take them across, the same way Tarantino did with Red Apple cigarettes. So there's the idea that this is taking place in a universe."



    Although Brits and action don't necessarily go hand-in-hand, Shaun was cool enough, dark enough and more than funny enough to revitalise the zombie genre. Only time will tell if this follow-up can do the same for action. "We've got some good stuff already and when we get back we just want to knuckle down and write it," said Wright. "It will have elements of comedy and action and some kind of horror elements as well."



    Pegg and Wright are writing the script when they can on their tour (and when they're not maintaining their tour diary blog at www.shaunsquad.com) and hope to go into production next year.



    And the working title for this Working Title production? "There's a couple of working titles. We're deciding between whether it's going to be Raging Fuzz or Hot Fuzz. It may be neither of these, but it could be fuzz-related. I've got to do a film that doesn't have a pun in the title," laughed Wright. Why so? Worked out pretty well for SOTD. "My CV reads A Fistful of Fingers and Shaun of the Dead. I can't do any more pun-based titles. I can't do it. My IMDB entry is going to look ridiculous!"

  2. #2
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    Meet the flying squad

    Kevin Maher takes a spin with the stars of police comedy Hot Fuzz

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    Burn it! Burn it!? The comedian, writer and actor Simon Pegg grips the dashboard and screams excitedly as our black GTi hits the first of many turbo-charged hand-brake turns. The tyres screech against the asphalt, the interior fills with smoke, and the car becomes a weightless whirling dervish, spinning wildly in woozy 360s. In a moment our mild-mannered driver, Russell, will slam the left side of the car into a ramp, flip us up on to our right, and cruise effortlessly across the test track on two wheels. “This is how I drove here today,? jokes Pegg, from his suddenly elevated passenger seat position. “All the way from Crouch End!?



    We are here, at the centre of a vast testing facility in greenest Bedfordshire, to celebrate the launch of Pegg’s new film, Hot Fuzz. A cop movie action-parody (just don’t call it a “spoof? — he’ll explain why when we’ve caught our breath), it is of course replete with top-notch car chases; hence my desire to be shown how it’s all done.



    Pegg’s co-star and long-time friend, Nick Frost, is also here, but at another part of the facility, and in a red GTi. The pair, affable slackers onscreen, have evolved into their own iconic comedy double act. Through the TV series Spaced, and the smash-hit horror-comedy Shaun of the Dead, they’ve come to represent the new manifestation of modern British blokishness — sensitive, angsty fanboys who are nonetheless enthralled by the allure of traditional masculinity. “Something like this is very primal,? says Pegg, later, gesturing out to the test circuit. “It’s about conquering something, and controlling it.? Frost, sitting beside him, nods and then adds, deadpan: “It’s like breaking in a horse.?



    For the moment, however, there is still the “Alpine? track to conquer. Our new driver, Kieran, a formerpoliceman, explains that this part of the track is meant to simulate an Alpine driving environment, complete with twists, turns, cambers and crests to drop left, drop right and, finally, get airborne. He turns quickly to me in the back. “Hope you have a strong stomach. It’s always worse in the back!?



    Sorry, did someone say “airborne?? “Yes,? says Kieran, “It’s quite safe.? Within seconds we’re tearing through a series of queasily realistic alpine passes. We’ve done 140mph on the straight and it feels as if we’re getting faster with each gut-wrenching twist and turn. To make matters worse, the conversation turns to the topic of Richard Hammond, and his infamous Top Gear spill. “I’ve done the same track that Richard Hammond did when he had his crash,? says Kieran, jauntily, as we plummet down towards a hairpin bend. “OK, guys,? he adds, casually, “We’re going to be airborne in a second.?



    We race upwards towards a crest in the road. Kieran floors it. Pegg yelps: “Wu-hooooo!? Suddenly, we have the most fantastic view of the Bedfordshire countryside. From the air. We have officially left the road. The contents of my stomach — threebreakfast skewers, courtesy of Volkswagen hospitality, a Danish pastry, and the remains of last night’s cabernet sauvignon — are officially about to leave my digestive system . . .



    Hot Fuzz is the brainchild of the 36-year-old Pegg and his 32-year-old Shaun of the Dead co-writer and director Edgar Wright. Much like the latter movie, and indeed much like the ground-breaking TV series Spaced from which it emerged, Hot Fuzzis forged in the jarring juxtaposition of big-budget American action movie values with everyday British social concerns.



    Thus we have Pegg, in perhaps his “straightest? role to date, as the super-cop Sergeant Nicholas Angel,an expert in tactical firearms and hand-to-hand combat who is unceremoniously transferred from crime-ridden London to the sleepy English hamlet of Standford (actual location, Wells in Somerset). Here, after some initial frustration with the limits of small-town life, Angel soon discovers that the village’s ostensibly twee Neighbourhood Watch Association (NWA, geddit!) is hiding a homicidal heart. Which is, of course, a nice cue for Pegg and co-star Frost, as the impressionable Officer Danny Butterman, to load up with an improbable amount of interballistic hardware and gamely reference a helter skelter series of action movie staples such as Lethal Weapon, Point Break and John Woo’s The Killer.



    And yet, it’s not just about sitting back and ticking off the movie nods, says Pegg. And it’s certainly not a spoof. “That word frustrates me the most,? says Pegg. “It was used in relation to Shaun of the Dead, and I’m sure it’ll be used to describe this. But it’s not a spoof. We tried to make a credible action police film, but one that was transplanted, completely faithfully, to Somerset. And when you do that you don’t need to tell many jokes to be funny. Shaun of the Dead wasn’t a spoof of a zombie film. It was a zombie film that just happened to be a comedy.?



    Pegg describes Hot Fuzzas the next evolutionary step up from Shaun, with bigger production values, more elaborate stunts, and a sprawling cast list that includes Steve Coogan, Bill Nighy, Timothy Dalton and an uncredited and heavily disguised cameo (she wears a forensics mask for the entire scene) from the Oscar-winning actress Cate Blanchett as Angel’s girlfriend Janine. “I’m not legally allowed to confirm it,? saysPegg, sheepishly. “It’s because of, er, the actress’s contract. It’s a silly thing, just one of those things because it’s uncredited. But you’ve pretty much hit it on the mark. And it’s there for everyone to spot.?



    Despite the heavy-hitting performers, the lavish action sequences andgrotesque sight gags (the demise of a roving reporter, played by TV’s Adam Buxton, has to be seen to be believed), Hot Fuzz can occasionally seem a little too enamoured of its own concept. Especially during the third act, when the action parody begins to adopt an orgiastic excess all of its own, the film is in genuine danger of unravelling. What keeps it together, as with their previous collaborations, is the on-screen chemistry and loosely worn affection between Pegg and Frost and their fictionalcounterparts. In Hot Fuzz, Butterman is the giddy hyperactive child to Angel’s stolidly repressed father figure — they are the yin and yang of small-town policing, and they need each other to become, ultimately, whole.



    With the Alpine track conquered, Pegg and Frost flop down togetheron a wide black couch in the facility’s spacious, and grandly titled, Concept Centre. “You’ve only, just now, started to go the normal colour of a human,? observes Pegg, pointing to my ashen face.



    After some prompting, he turns to Frost to analyse just what it is about their screen bond that has attracted a diehard fanbase that ranges from comic geek web-nerds to Alist directors such as Sam Raimi and Quentin Tarantino. It is, incidentally, a bond that’s set to endure through anothertwo Pegg/Frost movie collaborations — the first is a script that the pair are currently writing, the second will be a final genre flick in the Edgar Wright trilogy.



    I suggest that with Hot Fuzz especially, which incessantly plucks at the homoerotic undertones of the buddy movie, there’s an admission of sorts that Frost and Pegg have an eminently watchable romantic chemistry. Albeit one that’s accompanied by explosions and pump-action shotguns.



    “Well, look at us now, look at the body language!? says Frost, pointing to their half-locked limbs, with a mock metrosexual frankness.



    “Very open,? adds Pegg, who married the Scottish PR agent Maureen McCann in July 2005.



    “It’s man love,? says Frost. “It’s the way forward for society.?



    Pegg laughs, and Frost regroups, momentarily serious. “We’ve been best friends for almost 15 years,? he says. “But because we’re older now, and we’ve got partners, there’s a real glee when we actually get to spend three or four months together. And so doing this job is, generally, a joy.?



    “We make these films with nothing but love and affection,? Pegg adds. “The chemistry between us is simple, and maybe it comes across on screen.?



    Yes, but what about the blatant allure of guns, fast cars and macho histrionics?



    “What we’re basically saying,? explains Pegg, “is that you can be a man, you can cock your weapon, but just have a little bit of love in your life, too.?

  3. #3
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    I look forward too seeing it

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    It's fun....

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    Good to see veterans like Woodward and Whitelaw getting an airing. And who knew how funny Timothy Dalton could be???

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    Quote Originally Posted by D Cairns
    Good to see veterans like Woodward and Whitelaw getting an airing. And who knew how funny Timothy Dalton could be???


    Oh I don't know...didn't you see his Bond films??

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    I went to see "Hot Fuzz" on Sunday. Good bit of escapism for 2 hours, lots of action. Some parts didn't make a great deal of sense...Metropolitan police sergeant posted to west country??? Have they moved the boundaries of the Met that far?

    However, if you want a film that is rich in british actors and both funny and action packed...this is the film for you.

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    Hot fuss over Hot Fuzz

    Wednesday February 21, 2007

    Guardian Unlimited



    Hot Fuzz

    In hot pursuit... Hot Fuzz





    Hot Fuzz, the police-procedural-thriller-action-comedy from the team behind Shaun of the Dead, shot to the top of the British box office at the weekend.



    With a lineup featuring the cream of British comedy - Bill Bailey, Bill Nighy and Martin Freeman among others - alongside heavyweight thesps such as Billie Whitelaw and Timothy Dalton having a ball, the story of an overachieving police officer in a sleepy crime-free village laughed all the way to the bank. It raked in an opening haul of £5.9m.


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    Thought it was very good and with a more substantial plot than Shaun of the Dead. I feared it would be Pegg and Frost playing the same characters as SotD but whereas Shaun is a slacker, supercop Nick Angle (arf) has a rod up his backside for the first hour of a film that plays like Lethal Weapon meets The Wicker Man. The supporting cast is marvellous; Dalton's criminal mastermind from Somerfield's, Edward Woodward from NWA (not the rappers), and especially stereotyped nutcase Paddy Considine playing the plain-clothed police officer. If you wanna be a big officer in a small town... feck off up the model village. Quite.

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    I finally went to see HF last night. It wasn't quite was I was expecting. The gory bits were a little too gory. Would have been better left unseen and rely on the characters reactions instead. The flash-pan camera work and rapid editing was a bit painfull too.



    Entertaining with quite a lot of film jokes. Pity I don't remember the two american films that they often referred too.

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    Hi All,



    i'm looking for screenshots of the hot fuzz character michael. I've searched everywhere but I cannot find screen caps of him in the film.



    Anyone got any caps they took themselves or ideas as to where i can look?

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    Super Moderator Country: United States wearysloth's Avatar
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    Yarp.



    Rory McCann, was in the running for 007 at one point...

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    Hot Fuzz was by far the best black comedy I have seen for a very long time. It catered for the buddy cop hero/heros and took the mickey out of them. I love Edgar Wights work and his other film Shaun of the dead was just as good.



    Anyone out there agree with me ???



    Gillian

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    I half agree with you.... I loved Hot Fuzz,hated Shaun of the Dead!

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    I love Edgar Wights work and his other film Shaun of the dead was just as good.
    Partial agreement. HOT FUZZ has become my go-to-for-laughs film among recent releases. When there is garbage on network TV, I seek out FUZZ on cable. High energy, good satirizing and spoofing, and grand cast. A bit long though. But I never fail to laugh out loud. And it's a pleasure to catch bits of business I've missed previously.



    SHAUN was fun. Some super scenes, but I felt it rambled.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Country: Scotland narabdela's Avatar
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    The only problem with Hot Fuzz is the pacing. it all goes a bit flat about 2/3 of the way through before it picks up again.

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    I like Simon Pegg's work but Nick Frost's schtick is becoming a bit wearing.

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    I enjoyed Hot Fuzz immensely - far superior to Richard Curtis' scripted films. Can't comment on Shaun Of The Dead - not seen it yet.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

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    Senior Member Country: England mallee59's Avatar
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    I enjoyed Hot Fuzz immensely - far superior to Richard Curtis' scripted films. Can't comment on Shaun Of The Dead - not seen it yet.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B
    Agree, brilliant film for our viewing here along with Shaun, seen both numerous times now and they always get a viewing on a regular basis when young Miss Mallee is home from Uni...


  20. #20
    Senior Member Country: England Captain Casper's Avatar
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    I enjoyed Hot Fuzz immensely - far superior to Richard Curtis' scripted films. Can't comment on Shaun Of The Dead - not seen it yet.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B
    Get some popcorn, turn the TV up and watch it. Superb film from people who understand how much comedy to wring out of Romero films. A nice performance from the underused Dylan Moran too.



    Hot Fuzz wasn't as good, in my opinion. I think it was about 10 minutes too long and lost the pace a little. Still a great movie. I'm looking forward to their next film.

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