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  1. #1
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    Hello, all. I'm new to these premises, so please forgive me if I screw up somehow.



    Let me iterate the query I've already made on another forum largely dedicated to British and European cinema and television:



    Growing up here in Canada in the 1970s, the CBC had a sort of matinee package show running for two hours on Saturdays and later Sundays known as Peanuts & Popcorn (the U.S. equivalent was CBS Children's Film Festival, while the British equivalent was probably those CFF theatrical matinees). Each two-hour episode consisted of an installment of the Canadian-made cartoon Captain Nemo, a short movie (quite often a CFF production), and an installment in a foreign mini-series or serial. CFF films included The Boy Who Turned Yellow, Blinker's Spy Spotter, Up In The Air, Glitterball, etc. The most prominent foreign mini-series was the Swedish Den Vita Stenen--dubbed in British English as The White Stone.



    I have most of these old productions situated fairly clearly in my mind, but there are a few images and bits of dialogue that confuse me or lack origin. Most prominent among these are the following:



    1)The first time I ever heard ginger ale referred to as 'ginger beer' was in some British sci-fi film or series--most likely a CFF production. A young fellow is taken aboard a spacecraft, or brought into a parallel universe, or...(you get the picture), and is asked by (I think) an unseen force or being of some sort, "Would you like something to drink...?" To which the boy responds, "Yes, a ginger beer, please" (or something like that). Was it The Boy Who Turned Yellow...? An episode of a series or serial...?



    2)When I think of those old CFF productions, objects concealed in soccer/footballs come to mind. I'm pretty sure the head of Chico was sometimes lugged about in such a ball in The Boy With Two Heads / Chico The Rainmaker serial; but I also remember a glowing diode or crystal or something being smuggled about in a ball in some production or other. Was that in Blinker's Spy Spotter...? I'm pretty sure Blinker had a way of manipulating the football by remote control during a match. I also remember beefeaters playing a role in The Boy Who Turned Yellow and (I think) one other production. Can someone clarify any of this for me?



    3)I remember a series--a period piece set sometime in the early part of the 20th Century, I believe--where a young boy and girl are attempting to run away and join the circus. One scene had them running upon an elderly man and asking him, "Have you seen the circus?!! Have you seen the circus?!!" To which the old fellow replies, "The circus? Why, yes...I remember seeing the circus in the summer of 1887, or was it '88...?..." (or something like that); the children sigh in exasperation and run off again. Does this ring a bell for anyone? I thought it was a scene from Den Vita Stenen / The White Stone, because the circus looms heavily as a sub-theme in that series, and there's a scene where Hampus ('Tom' in the dubbed version) tries to persuade Fia ('Flora') to jump on the back of a departing circus caravan and run away with him (she declines at the last second). However, I found the complete Den Vita Stenen (in the original Svensk), all 13 episodes, as a torrent at The Pirate Bay, downloaded it, and watched it again in its entirety, and there was no such scene in that series. Can anyone tell me what film or series/serial contained this scene? Was it some version of Black Beauty...? Was it the 1978 German version of Heidi (I'm pretty sure the scene I'm thinking of was dubbed in British English)...? Or was it something else altogether...?



    Anyway, those are the three most contentious memories of foreign children's productions hovering in the back of my nostalgic mind--there are others. If anyone can help me straighten out any of these images and quotations, I would be quite grateful.



    Cheers.

  2. #2
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    Could it possibly be that us North Americans remember British and European children's productions better than the Brits and Euros...?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Country: UK Freddy's Avatar
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    Have a look at Children's Film and Television Foundation - Home Page.

    if you have not already done so.



    Regards



    Freddy

  4. #4
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    Ironically, the official site is probably the only CFF-oriented site I haven't visited! Cheers! The blurb regarding Blinker's Spy Spotter confirms just about everything I remembered about that film--would love to see it again, but it's one of the hardest to find on VHS or DVD.



    I'm still wondering about that film or series that had the quote about "ginger beer", though. I don't think the CBC carried The Tomorrow People....



    As for the children chasing the circus...??????

  5. #5
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    Well, I've done a little research, and it seems the CBC did carry The Tomorrow People briefly in the summer of '77 on Wednesday nights. I don't remember watching it, however....

  6. #6
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    name='LibertyCole']Well, I've done a little research, and it seems the CBC did carry The Tomorrow People briefly in the summer of '77 on Wednesday nights. I don't remember watching it, however....


    Brrrmmmpphh!!! I was wrong. I did watch The Tomorrow People, and loved it. It's just that the scenes and complete episodes that I had been coming across online were from later series/seasons and unrecognisable to me, and the ones that I had watched on the CBC were from 1973/'74. Recently, I came across some complete episodes from Series One.



    So...as far as this portion of my original quest goes:



    1)The first time I ever heard ginger ale referred to as 'ginger beer' was in some British sci-fi film or series--most likely a CFF production. A young fellow is taken aboard a spacecraft, or brought into a parallel universe, or...(you get the picture), and is asked by (I think) an unseen force or being of some sort, "Would you like something to drink...?" To which the boy responds, "Yes, a ginger beer, please" (or something like that). Was it The Boy Who Turned Yellow...? An episode of a series or serial...?



    Consider it answered. This scene takes place in the second episode from Series 1, the second installment in the 'Slaves of Jedekiah' storyline. It's Stephen's first time at Tomorrow headquarters, and the computer is providing him his first meal.



    However, I'm still stumped or unsure in regards to the other lines of my quest. Anyone with any thoughts or suggestions...?

  7. #7
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    Not an answer I'm afraid, but......



    ginger ale referred to as 'ginger beer'


    Ginger Beer is actually an entirely different drink to Ginger Ale.

  8. #8
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    Yes, I remember you telling me in a private message a while back--a message I can no longer access for some reason, due to my not posting here often enough. Fair enough, I s'pose.



    But onward, onward....



    In the months since I last checked in with this forum, I've occasionally done a bit of snooping around the net. One thing I uncovered--on a site called TV Archive--was a reference to the old CBC umbrella show Peanuts & Popcorn, which carried a lot of foreign children's films, British and Swedish mini series, cartoons, etc. One reader logged in to post the following comment:



    "I really liked the films from all over the world, like the one with the 2 kids in northern England during ww2 ,with a character named benjamin Sweet."



    Does this ring a bell...? It does for me, but I can't pinpoint its exact location mentally. Might this be the film or programme that satisfies Query No. 3 in my original post* above...?



    *3)I remember a series--a period piece set sometime in the early part of the 20th Century, I believe--where a young boy and girl are attempting to run away and join the circus. One scene had them running upon an elderly man and asking him, "Have you seen the circus?!! Have you seen the circus?!!" To which the old fellow replies, "The circus? Why, yes...I remember seeing the circus in the summer of 1887, or was it '88...?..." (or something like that); the children sigh in exasperation and run off again. Does this ring a bell for anyone? I thought it was a scene from Den Vita Stenen / The White Stone, because the circus looms heavily as a sub-theme in that series, and there's a scene where Hampus ('Tom' in the dubbed version) tries to persuade Fia ('Flora') to jump on the back of a departing circus caravan and run away with him (she declines at the last second). However, I found the complete Den Vita Stenen (in the original Svensk), all 13 episodes, as a torrent at The Pirate Bay, downloaded it, and watched it again in its entirety, and there was no such scene in that series. Can anyone tell me what film or series/serial contained this scene? Was it some version of Black Beauty...? Was it the 1978 German version of Heidi (I'm pretty sure the scene I'm thinking of was dubbed in British English)...? Or was it something else altogether...?

  9. #9
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    I remember the Tomorrow People but not well enough to remember a reference to Ginger beer/ale.



    Dodgy dubbed series include Heidi, as you say, the White Horses (dubbed from French into Franglais) and the Flashing Blade(dubbed from Spanish I think) and why did they never get to the end before the school holidays were over and we had to stop watching!



    The term British English is a Hollywood invention I'm afraid to make it sound like we speak a regional dialect of Standard American English instead of us just speaking English (because we are English and live in England) and them speaking a regional dialect of it.



    We only have :



    English

    English spoken with a Welsh accent

    Welsh

    English spoken with a Scots accent

    Scots

    Scots Gaelic

    and perhaps Cornish.



    Ireland doesn't count because it is not part of Britain but in any case they use English with an Irish accent

    Hiberno-English

    Irish



    No such thing as British English.

  10. #10
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    Yes, I agree, the concept of British English is a North American invention borne mostly out of expediency.



    You've confounded me, however, when it comes to 'Scots'--Where does it lie within the great pantheon and how does it differ from Gaelic and Scots English...? Oh, and even though there have been revival attempts, Cornish officially died around 1800.



    And then's the other dead one--Manx. Most people don't even seem to realise that the Isle Of Man exists. It seems to hover there, invisible within reality. One sometimes gets the impression--especially on this side of the Atlantic--that the island is like a large secret society trapped in time or colliding with a parallel universe; complete with people wearing hairshirts and cowls, communicating telepathically, telling courageous visitors, "Dare not land upon our shores! For if thou do, thou must stay forever!!!" (Could it have inspired The Prisoner...?!!!)

  11. #11
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    name='LibertyCole']You've confounded me, however, when it comes to 'Scots'--Where does it lie within the great pantheon and how does it differ from Gaelic and Scots English...?
    Scots, or lowland Scots is a Germanic language and is distinct from Scotish Gaelic as spoken in the Highlands of Scotland. Scots has imported a lot of English words over the years but remains a distinct language. Some people think that it's just a strong accent that makes Glaswegians hard (especially for Southern English people) to understand, but they are actually speaking a different language and using a lot of different words



    See [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scots_language"]Scots language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]





    Steve

  12. #12
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    name='rforbes']Ireland doesn't count because it is not part of Britain but in any case they use English with an Irish accent

    Hiberno-English

    Irish
    There's "Ulster Scots" as spoken by the descendants of Scottish settlers in Ulster, particularly counties Antrim, Down and Donegal.



    Steve

  13. #13
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    Steve is spot on. Scots is the language Robert Burns wrote in but IMHO it's not a real language with different grammar rules, word order etc. it is a Germanic dialect of Middle English with lots of different words and a heavy accent. My dad uses it a lot.



    Scots Gaelic is completely different, arguably a dialect of Irish, as is Manx. Thanks for reminding me. Manx should be closer to Irish but the written form was long lost by the time an Englishman visited the island to document the language and wrote down what he heard phonetically according to English letters which is why it looks so freaky. (Implying that Irish doesn't look freaky!!!)



    And the reason you can never leave the IOM is not to do with the Norse feudal government but because you realise that you would have to pay UK tax again!



    So out of the 6 surviving (on paper) Celtic langauges, Irish, ScotsGaelic and Manx are grouped together as Q-Gaelic langauges and Welsh, Cornish and Breton are the P-Gaelic langauges.



    Ulster Scots! Or Lallans Scots (Lowland Scots). Thanks again Steve I missed that one but probably because the squabbling kids over there use it as a toy to throw out of their pram whenever the Irish raise the issue of their language. If the Irish have an ice cream then the Unionists want a lolly - an orange one of course.



    Sorry, are we off topic?

  14. #14
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    name='rforbes']Sorry, are we off topic?
    Often and usually

    Conversations rarely stick to one theme



    Steve

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    Off topic, indeed; but fun, though! I'm surprised no angry Manx folk have taken offence at my satirical thoughts on the way in which their island seems to be viewed by the modern world!

  16. #16
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    For Libertycole in The Dominion Canada



    001.png[/IMG]




  17. #17
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  18. #18
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    Thanks! Nice joke! I do believe I can remember the CBC carrying this on at least one occasion back in the '70s. There weren't many of those old CFF productions that they didn't carry at some time or another--usually as part of the Peanuts & Popcorn package show. Those old CFF films and serials were a major influence on Roch Demers' popular series of children's films here in Canada, Tales For All. Similarly, without Grange Hill, there could never have been any of those various Degrassi series.



    So, Barrule, you're from Man. Tell me, do you feel invisible and underappreciated in the world? (I can't remember the last time I heard or read anything in the news about your Isle.) And, more importantly, can you morph or time travel...? (Just kidding!)

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