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  1. #21
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    The pre-sales for release in Europe recovered the budget before the shoot was even completed. So despite rumours to the contary it did rather well.

  2. #22
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    Mrs.H. booked me a suprise week away in Arnhem a year or so back. She knew I love the film and wanted to visit. The film was shot nearby not in Arnhem but we visited all the key sites. At Oosterbeek we spoke to an elderly Dutchman, who not suprisingly, spoke very good English and had known Kate Ter Horst.



    He pointed out her house, next to the church and told us to ignore the post war 'add ons'. He showed us the meadow behind the church where in '46 or '47, Kate's son was killed while out playing. He stood on a land mine. Kate died as a result of a car accident. She was crossing the road to her house when an off duty policeman knocked her down. The Dutch chap claimed he was drunk but being a policeman, wasn't taken to court for 'lack of evidence'................



    Sad state of affairs for such a brave lady.

  3. #23
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harleybloke
    Mrs.H. booked me a suprise week away in Arnhem a year or so back. She knew I love the film and wanted to visit. The film was shot nearby not in Arnhem but we visited all the key sites. At Oosterbeek we spoke to an elderly Dutchman, who not suprisingly, spoke very good English and had known Kate Ter Horst.



    He pointed out her house, next to the church and told us to ignore the post war 'add ons'. He showed us the meadow behind the church where in '46 or '47, Kate's son was killed while out playing. He stood on a land mine. Kate died as a result of a car accident. She was crossing the road to her house when an off duty policeman knocked her down. The Dutch chap claimed he was drunk but being a policeman, wasn't taken to court for 'lack of evidence'................



    Sad state of affairs for such a brave lady.
    It was sad, some of the things that happened to Kate. She deserved better luck than that. Her husband lived until he was 98 (2003) and I think that the other children are still alive. One of the daughters was living in her old house.



    Kate wrote a book "Cloud Over Arnhem" and AIUI she appeared in Theirs is the Glory (1946) (aka Men of Arnhem)



    Two things to do in that area.

    Walk from the drop zones to the west of Oosterbeek, near Wolfheeze, into Arnhem - and then tried to imagine doing it heavily laden and under fire.



    Second, have a look at the river by Oosterbeek and imagine trying to swim it or even to try to cross it in a small boat under fire.



    Steve

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook
    It was sad, some of the things that happened to Kate. She deserved better luck than that. Her husband lived until he was 98 (2003) and I think that the other children are still alive. One of the daughters was living in her old house.



    Kate wrote a book "Cloud Over Arnhem" and AIUI she appeared in Theirs is the Glory (1946) (aka Men of Arnhem)



    Two things to do in that area.

    Walk from the drop zones to the west of Oosterbeek, near Wolfheeze, into Arnhem - and then tried to imagine doing it heavily laden and under fire.



    Second, have a look at the river by Oosterbeek and imagine trying to swim it or even to try to cross it in a small boat under fire.



    Steve
    Mrs.H. booked us into a wonderful hotel over looking the Rhine. I just stood on the balcony watching the current....................awesome feat!!

  5. #25
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    I think a movie about Kate Ter Host should be made one day, she certainly had a life full of tragic occurences but was clearly a remarkable woman.

  6. #26
    Super Moderator Country: United States wearysloth's Avatar
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    Always thought Alun Armstrong and his chicken was worth the price of admission.

  7. #27
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    Yeah there are a few big name British Actors in there early in their careers, including Ben Cross and Paul Copley.



    The story of the para jumping with a chicken was true, they ate it when it was killed by some artillery.

  8. #28
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    Where does Ben Cross appear in the film? Was he one of the paratroopers sent to hold the bridge? Must have had my blinkers on, as I just saw it a few days ago.

  9. #29
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    yeah he appears very briefly, he was essentially an extra, you can see him if the scene where everyone is walking to the Bridge and the Dutch are celebrating. He is also in lots of other scenes but its hard to spot him.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Country: England markrgv's Avatar
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    I was watching A Bridge Too Far again over the holiday - and what an epic film it is (and with no CGI) unlike most modern epics.
    Does anyone know the airfield used in the early sequences? I tried to find out - and can find everything except that!

    Also, i know there are some military experts on here - does anyone know the real airfields that the 4 different divisions (British 1st Airborne, US 82nd, US 101st, Polish Airborne) departed from on their missions?

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  12. #32
    Senior Member Country: England markrgv's Avatar
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    Thanks for the link ayrshireman

  13. #33
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    I drove across the Arnhem Bridge a couple of months ago. It's called The John Frost Bridge now. Sorry if this has been mentioned before.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by puptent View Post
    Where does Ben Cross appear in the film? Was he one of the paratroopers sent to hold the bridge? Must have had my blinkers on, as I just saw it a few days ago.
    And three years later somebody spots this post and has the answer:-

    This is a picture of Ben Cross sitting on the stairs of the shot-up building nest to the Bridge at Arnhem

    Image1.jpg

  15. #35
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    There are a few unforgivable things about the book, written by an anti British Irish Ammerican I believe, which were carried over into the film.

    Not least the injustice to XXX Corps units who suffered very heavy casualties in reaching the Rhine. The fact that one infantry Bn, the Dorsets, managed to cross the river being met by men of the Devons who formed part of the Air Landing Brigade of 1st Airborne Division. Together they suffered casualties in in the 80% range.

    For the book and film to have a Guards Armoured Division officer teling his men to sit down and drink tea arguing the point with commander of the 82nd who's men are bravely fighting on is disgusting. The event has no basis in reality and is just part of the post war propoganda that the Americans were all red blooded heroes whilst the British sat down in their Anderson shelters, listened to Vera Lynn and drank tea.

    Nor is the initaial plan described that was to include the 52 Lowland Division (Air Landing) being used to support 1st Airborne and that it was the US dominated troop carrier command which caused the British lift to be in two parts, landing in the wrong place without the suport of 52 Div.

    Not a bad war film, as a young lad I loved it but historically pure nonsense.

  16. #36
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    Can't agree with any of those comments above.

    The film is a very accurate account of what happened, but it is an overview.

    The 52 lowland division was never included in the planning for the operation, the plan was to bring it in after the operation was completed but it was never part of Market Garden, nor was it intended to be. The commander offered to use them to reinforce the reinforce the bridgehead and take them but Browning send them a communique which stated (And its documented) 'Situation not as bad as you think' and he declined the help.

    Your assessment of the air lift is also incorrect. If anything the most large waste of air freight on the first lift was browning utilising 32 gilders to take in all the elements of his HQ which effectively did very little for the operation in Nijmegen. The most up to date source on many facts are actually all from archieves that are now in Holland, and no American bias.

    There were alot of mistakes, made by both the Americans and the British. Gavin should have insisted on a closer landing to Nijmegen Bridge, but he didn't.

    The film does not cover the huge number of casualties incurred on the Island in the subsequent weeks, but its not about those events.

    As the writer said, 'A Bridge Too Far' was a chance to say 'war sucked' and it does that. Both British and American bravery is highlighted in the film, no one is favoured, and both their failings are also shown.

  17. #37
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cardinal Wolsey View Post
    There are a few unforgivable things about the book, written by an anti British Irish Ammerican I believe, which were carried over into the film.

    Not least the injustice to XXX Corps units who suffered very heavy casualties in reaching the Rhine. The fact that one infantry Bn, the Dorsets, managed to cross the river being met by men of the Devons who formed part of the Air Landing Brigade of 1st Airborne Division. Together they suffered casualties in in the 80% range.

    For the book and film to have a Guards Armoured Division officer teling his men to sit down and drink tea arguing the point with commander of the 82nd who's men are bravely fighting on is disgusting. The event has no basis in reality and is just part of the post war propoganda that the Americans were all red blooded heroes whilst the British sat down in their Anderson shelters, listened to Vera Lynn and drank tea.

    Nor is the initaial plan described that was to include the 52 Lowland Division (Air Landing) being used to support 1st Airborne and that it was the US dominated troop carrier command which caused the British lift to be in two parts, landing in the wrong place without the suport of 52 Div.

    Not a bad war film, as a young lad I loved it but historically pure nonsense.
    I've only just seen this post and I agree with Azanti, it's your comments that are mistaken.

    What makes you think that Cornelius Ryan was anti-British? I don't think that there's anything in the book or the film or in any of his other work that gives that impression.

    The episode about the tanks refusing to advance beyond Nijmegen without infantry support did happen. That was standard military practice at the time. Tanks didn't advance without infantry support, especially into unknown territory along a raised, single track road. It would be too easy to disable a few tanks and block the rest of them, making them sitting ducks. It's hardly surprising that Major Cook was upset, having just led his men through one of the bravest assaults of the war, to see that they weren't going to advance immediately. But the film didn't show the scene just after that when the reasoning was explained to him and he agreed with it

    A few advance parties from XXX corps did manage to get across the river, but not in enough numbers to make any difference. What was more useful was the artillery fire that could be brought in of the Germans attacking the group at Oosterbeek.

    There were hundreds of initial plans, which were then dropped. The film isn't about any of those, it's about the action that actually happened. It was partly because of all the abandoned plans that everyone was so keen to grasp at the one plan that looked like it might actually happen - even those who didn't have much confidence in it. The whole operation was put together in a very short time.

    Browning taking his staff to the Nijmegen was totally pointless militarily and used up a lot of planes. If those planes had been made available to the 1st Airborne Division then maybe they wouldn't had had to spread the drop over two days and so maybe they wouldn't have had to leave so many men guarding the drop zones and so maybe they could have got more men to the bridge.

    But there were loads of things that went wrong, had just a few of them gone right then the outcome might have been very different.

    But the film is a very accurate portrayal of lots of the events that did happen. Not every single event of course, but nearly all of the named characters in the film were real people and all the events shown are documented to have happened. That is very rare in this sort of thing.

    If you don't like it, that's a shame, but you're entitled to your opinion

    Steve

  18. #38
    Senior Member Country: UK Windthrop's Avatar
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    Underrated film with a great score. As mentioned earlier in the thread Daphne Du Maurier had reservations and Bogarde was upset and blamed Attenborough for the rest of his life. Uncharitable to say the least given that RA showed much kindness to DB right from their first meeting during the 40s at Rank. There were even rumours that RA pulled strings to get DB his Knighthood after the death of his partner when he was lonely and drinking heavily.

  19. #39
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    Textual highlights from the biography of Daphne du Maurier, by Margaret Forster.

    "When the book (by Cornelius Ryan) came out in 1974 she (Daphne du Maurier) was sent a copy. She was relieved not to have found anything offensive about Tommy in it; she thought he was treated fairly...and her main concerns that Tommy's reputation should not be damaged, and his memory not tarnished, were satisfied".

    "But when she heard Richard Attenborough was going to film the book, she was instantly suspicious. She wrote to Attenborough asking to see the script when it was ready, and he replied that she should have no worries because he wanted to pay proper respect to all concerned."

    "But then it was announced that Dirk Bogarde was to play Tommy and she was convinced he would depict her husband as effete and mincing. Attenborough defended Bogarde by pointing out that he (Bogarde) had been an intelligence officer in the army and was able to play General Browning authentically. Daphne was sent the script and realised at once that Tommy was cast as a minor character and came out of it with no credit at all. She was furious and extremely upset."

    Forster's account specifically details du Maurier's exception to the missing out of the phrase "bridge too far" in the original script, and further references to the script's description of Tommy which "made him sound like a dandy who shrank from dirty work". According to Margaret Forster, the Dirk Bogarde line "Bridge Too Far" was seen to be what du Maurier classed it as, a bit stuck on the end as an addition.

    From "Daphne du Maurier" by Margaret Forster.
    Published 1993 by Chatto and Windus.

    Rick C archive copy published by Arrow Books, 1994

  20. #40
    Senior Member Country: UK Windthrop's Avatar
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    Thanks for that Rick C. Personally I quite liked Bogarde's performance in the film and felt he made a strong impact even amongst that stellar cast.

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